Don’t open this email from “Adobe”

Dec 7, 2020

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Don’t open this email from “Adobe”

Dec 7, 2020

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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There’s a new phishing scam going around, targeting Adobe users, according to a report from TechRadar. It involves sending an email from the “Adobe Cloud” service informing them that they have files available to download. Only you don’t. “Adobe Cloud” isn’t a real thing. And nor is the email or the website it sends you to.

By all accounts, the email appears to look completely genuine on first glance, complete with real looking URLs. But they say that the next stage of the attack prompts you to “Access Your Secured Document”, which then presents you with a login page for Microsoft Office 365, Google or their email account. And if you fill in your details, well… you know what happens next.

It’s a phishing scam that’s been going around for a while, although it’s the first one I’ve seen in a while that specifically attacks Adobe. As with most of them, spotting them is fairly straightforward if you don’t just take them at face value. The fact that services such as “Adobe Cloud” do not actually exist, for example, is a big clue in this instance that it’s not a genuine email from Adobe.

Most genuine emails from legit organisations you have an account with will also address you by your actual name, too. It won’t just be “Dear Customer” or some similar such generic greeting. They will use your name. And always look at the actual URL of the links it wants you to click before you click them.

If in doubt, don’t click any links at all, just go to the company’s actual website yourself and login there. If it’s legit then the information will pop up in there when you login. If it’s not (like all those fake PayPal email scams), it won’t and know it’s fake.

99% of phishing scams are easy to spot if you take a step back and really examine them properly before clicking on stuff!

[via TechRadar]

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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