Don’t miss your only chance to photograph the green comet for the next 50,000 years

Jan 21, 2023

Alex Baker

Alex Baker is a portrait and lifestyle driven photographer based in Valencia, Spain. She works on a range of projects from commercial to fine art and has had work featured in publications such as The Daily Mail, Conde Nast Traveller and El Mundo, and has exhibited work across Europe

Don’t miss your only chance to photograph the green comet for the next 50,000 years

Jan 21, 2023

Alex Baker

Alex Baker is a portrait and lifestyle driven photographer based in Valencia, Spain. She works on a range of projects from commercial to fine art and has had work featured in publications such as The Daily Mail, Conde Nast Traveller and El Mundo, and has exhibited work across Europe

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This is your only chance to photograph the green comet for the next 50,000 years

If you want to photograph a comet without requiring special astrophotography gear, then the next two weeks could be your best opportunity. You certainly won’t get another opportunity to see this particular comet again, as the next time will be in 50,000 years. I don’t know about you, but I’m not planning to be around then!

According to NASA, the Comet C/2022 E3, as it’s been so catchily titled, will be at its closest point to earth on February 2, 2023.

It should be visible in the Northern hemisphere and will likely be the first comet to be seen with the naked eye since the Neowise comet in 2020. The other interesting thing about this comet is that it has an unusual green hue to it, which could create some spectacular images.

If you want to try to capture the comet with your camera, then this week would be a good opportunity, weather permitting, peaking around January 29th. The moon phase will be a new moon, allowing the darker skies to lend greater visibility to stars, planets, and of course, comets.

Of course, you’ll still need to find a dark sky location, far away from city light pollution, to see the comet. According to F Stoppers, it will be visible above the North Eastern horizon after midnight in the Northern Hemisphere.

Like any night sky photography, you’ll need a tripod, an ISO of at least 400, but usually up to around 3600 is fine with modern cameras, and a long exposure of up to 15 seconds to avoid star trails. If you have a star tracker, then you can take longer exposures, of course. If using a longer lens, then you’ll either need a star tracker device or you’ll have to shoot shorter exposures according to the 500 rule.

[Image credit: John Vermette, CC BY-SA 4.0 via Wikimedia Commons]

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Alex Baker

Alex Baker

Alex Baker is a portrait and lifestyle driven photographer based in Valencia, Spain. She works on a range of projects from commercial to fine art and has had work featured in publications such as The Daily Mail, Conde Nast Traveller and El Mundo, and has exhibited work across Europe

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3 responses to “Don’t miss your only chance to photograph the green comet for the next 50,000 years”

  1. Fmc Avatar
    Fmc

    U cannot do long exposure of 15s with a telephoto lens. Otherwise u get star trails. Use the following formula 200/focal length. So with a 50mm. 4sec. With a 200mm, 1sec. U will most likely need to boost iso to 3200.

    1. Alex Avatar
      Alex

      Thanks for spotting that! Corrections made now.

  2. John Beatty Avatar
    John Beatty

    Admins, please delete if against rules…
    If you are looking to photo/video comet and have Lens Pills…
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ehYPi9uPc5w