Don’t believe this myth about new photography gear

Jul 27, 2023

Alex Baker

Alex Baker is a portrait and lifestyle driven photographer based in Valencia, Spain. She works on a range of projects from commercial to fine art and has had work featured in publications such as The Daily Mail, Conde Nast Traveller and El Mundo, and has exhibited work across Europe

Don’t believe this myth about new photography gear

Jul 27, 2023

Alex Baker

Alex Baker is a portrait and lifestyle driven photographer based in Valencia, Spain. She works on a range of projects from commercial to fine art and has had work featured in publications such as The Daily Mail, Conde Nast Traveller and El Mundo, and has exhibited work across Europe

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How many times have I heard the phrase, “You have a great camera, you must be a really good photographer”? It’s true that right now, at this exact moment, I do have a really, really good camera (thanks to Canon for the loan of a beautiful R5C, sadly, I have to give it back!). That camera in my hands has allowed me to try out things that I wouldn’t be able to do otherwise.

Most of us learn the hard way that the newest expensive gear doesn’t equal being a better photographer or getting better-paid jobs. In this video, Taylor Jackson tells us about his own journey of believing this myth and of his subsequent recovery from GAS.

Taylor tells us how he placed far too much weight on the gear that he owned when he first started out in photography. He didn’t understand that it was actually his growing skills and experience as a photographer that helped him get more clients, not the gear.

If you have this mindset, you are in danger of falling into the trap of never feeling ‘enough’. Camera manufacturers are always going to bring out a newer, bigger, better, faster camera or lens, it is nearly impossible to keep up with them. They are there to sell cameras. We must resist that urge.

I personally have a rule that if I need a particular piece of gear for a job, that job needs to pay enough to justify purchasing that equipment (i.e. it must pay more than the equipment costs, like, a lot more). Otherwise, I can rent or just make it work with what I have.

Most of the time, we really don’t need all of these fancy new gadgets, we can produce just as beautiful images with a ten-year-old DSLR as we can with the latest mirrorless camera.

I am so tempted to cough up almost four grand for the loaned Canon R5C myself once the return date arrives. However, I know that actually owning that camera will not drastically change my life, nor will it make me a better photographer. Honestly, that money would be better spent on other things.*

*Please remind me of this daily so that I can resist the urge to buy it!

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Alex Baker

Alex Baker

Alex Baker is a portrait and lifestyle driven photographer based in Valencia, Spain. She works on a range of projects from commercial to fine art and has had work featured in publications such as The Daily Mail, Conde Nast Traveller and El Mundo, and has exhibited work across Europe

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6 responses to “Don’t believe this myth about new photography gear”

  1. Andrus Chesley Avatar
    Andrus Chesley

    Not about the gear or the age of it. It’s how you use it. Course my old film camera equipment is in the garage on a shelf for many years. And my Canon T3i with 4 different lens sits on a shelf in this room, unused for about 3 years. My other 4 Canon cameras , hmmmmm the M50 is used the most presently with the 2 G16’s next in line and the Xs50 zoomer used every once in a while when I need to reach out.

  2. DIYPhotography Avatar
    DIYPhotography

    Carter Tune I whole heatedly agree

  3. Peter John Avatar
    Peter John

    New gear only makes it easier.

  4. Dick Blom Avatar
    Dick Blom

    Aww.. Just one please.. Promise! 🙏😢

  5. Philip La Lumiere Avatar
    Philip La Lumiere

    Carter Tune and even then, a lot of the time I’ve found it better to have a set of general purpose gear. And then if I need anything specialized (Eg: 500mm for an airshow) I’ll just rent a nice one for the day.

    Chances are, im not gonna need that 500mm for anything else, and would never make the money back on it unless I bought used at a good price and then resold it afterwards (which I’ve done with success many times, lens prices are super stable. Find a good enough deal and you might make a profit by buying and reselling).

    My kit was a 5d mk ii, 24-70 2.8, 70-200 2.8, and 40mm “pancake” prime (tbh my favourite lens, cheap, sharp, and only 5mm thicker than a lens cap). A few flashes and lights but overall, anything else was either rented or bought used and resold.

    Tbh, I don’t think I’ve ever actually paid for a camera, all of them were used/resells and I never lost money on any of them. Did like 300 cameras like that

  6. Keith Patrâk Avatar
    Keith Patrâk

    I always buy second hand gear, I have a Olympus EM5ii with a few budget lenses and it is more than enough for my needs