China sets rules and punishments for generative AI

Dec 15, 2022

Alex Baker

Alex Baker is a portrait and lifestyle driven photographer based in Valencia, Spain. She works on a range of projects from commercial to fine art and has had work featured in publications such as The Daily Mail, Conde Nast Traveller and El Mundo, and has exhibited work across Europe

China sets rules and punishments for generative AI

Dec 15, 2022

Alex Baker

Alex Baker is a portrait and lifestyle driven photographer based in Valencia, Spain. She works on a range of projects from commercial to fine art and has had work featured in publications such as The Daily Mail, Conde Nast Traveller and El Mundo, and has exhibited work across Europe

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China sets rules and punishments for generative AI

Chinese authorities have set rules and corresponding punishments to try to keep up with the rapidly changing pace of AI-generated images.

The Cyberspace Administration of China, which keeps tabs on all things internet related, has passed a regulation on “deep synthesis” technology. The new laws will go into effect from January 10th, 2023, and effectively require any AI-generated images to have a watermark that defines them as such.

The administration defines deep synthesis technology as “technology that uses deep learning, virtual reality, and other synthesis algorithms to generate text, images, audio, video, and virtual scenes.”

The majority of the rules outlined are fairly run-of-the-mill, and mostly seek to keep within ethical boundaries relating to using generative AI to engage in activities that endanger national security, damage public interest or are illegal.

The administration also announced that AI images generated from synthesis programs such as DALL-E would require watermarks or other labels to mark them clearly.

Interestingly, the Chinese government is one of the first to make pre-emptive moves on the use of AI and possible misuse. The rules ban people from using deep synthesis tech to generate and disseminate fake news. Platforms also must remind users to get permission before they alter others’ faces and voices using deep synthesis technology.

Finally, in the case that the result of generative AI may cause confusion or misidentification by the public, the service provider must put a watermark in a prominent place to inform the public that it is a work by the machine.

Of course, anyone flouting these rules will be punished accordingly. Service providers are required to keep detailed accounts of non-rule abiding, and must pass on details to the authorities.

As AI becomes more and more involved in our everyday lives, these issues will be something that more governments will be forced to address.

[Via TechCrunch]

 

 

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Alex Baker

Alex Baker

Alex Baker is a portrait and lifestyle driven photographer based in Valencia, Spain. She works on a range of projects from commercial to fine art and has had work featured in publications such as The Daily Mail, Conde Nast Traveller and El Mundo, and has exhibited work across Europe

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