Canon confirms the EOS R5 overheats in 4K as well

Jul 14, 2020

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Canon confirms the EOS R5 overheats in 4K as well

Jul 14, 2020

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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There’s been a lot of chatter and speculation lately about the potential overheating issues with the new Canon EOS R5. Given that very few people even have one in their hands, it’s difficult to know for sure exactly how it will perform in the real world, although Canon has now confirmed the times mentioned in Max Yurev’s video, and also extended the table to include other shooting modes.

While some of the overheating modes had already been released, there were still questions to be answered. The biggie that most people wanted to know was how well does it handle 4K 120fps footage and how long can you keep shooting it for? Well, Canon has now answered.

Pro gear specialists and retailer CVP was sent a table of overheat times by Canon. CVP’s tech advisor, Jake Ratcliffe then posted this to Twitter for the rest of us to see. The table does indeed confirm that the EOS R5 shuts down after 20 minutes when shooting 8K video, regardless of whether it’s RAW video or not. But the table also reveals details about the EOS R5’s other modes and their respective time limits.

According to the list, this is how the EOS R5 currently stands up in different resolutions and frame rates, according to the official word from Canon.

  • 8K RAW 30p – 20 minutes
  • 8K HEVC 30p – 20 minutes
  • 4K 120p – 15 minutes
  • 4K 60p (no crop) – 35 minutes (two separate files of 29m 59s and 5m)
  • 4K 60 (crop, 5.1K oversample) – 25 minutes
  • 4K HQ 30p (8.2K oversample) – 30 minutes
  • 4K 30p – Not limited

This actually doesn’t sound that terrible at all, really. It’s unlikely that most people will need more than 4K 30fps for their general use, and even the “high quality” 8.2K oversampled mode isn’t too terrible at 30 minutes, depending on how long you have to leave it to cool down before you can shoot at that format again – something that wasn’t included in the table, although was briefly touched on for some modes before.

4K 120fps footage does initially sound quite shocking, though, at only 15 minutes. But then, how often are you really going to shoot 4K 120 for long periods of time? Slowing down 120fps footage to 24fps means it’s playing back at a fifth of regular speed. Your 15-minute file now takes an hour and fifteen minutes to play back.

The main issue, I suppose, would come if you’re regularly bouncing between 4K30 for your main shots and then 4K120 for your sexy slow-mo b-roll shots. Until it starts getting into more peoples hands and we can see what kind of an impact this has in the real world, it’s difficult to know how much of an issue it will really become. But it might mean that some of you will have to plan out which segments you’re going to shoot in what order in order to minimise camera downtime due to overheating.

And for those who are shooting long events or weddings where you need to record continuously, then you still have regular 4K 30p that can go on until your batteries die. Or, you can just buy a different camera.

[via Digital Camera World]

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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18 responses to “Canon confirms the EOS R5 overheats in 4K as well”

  1. Camera operator Hong Kong Avatar
    Camera operator Hong Kong

    User are reporting that 20 clips of 1mn duration during the span of an hour trigger the heat limit and camera stop recording.
    This is not acceptable.
    Worst. The second trigger is after 10 mn.
    So no interview, no event, no wedding.

    1. Jolyon Ralph Avatar
      Jolyon Ralph

      What users? the camera isn’t out yet. Only pre-production units in the hands of a few testers.

      1. Camera operator Hong Kong Avatar
        Camera operator Hong Kong

        Yes, that’s why Canon released an official statement; because there is no problem with overheating at all.
        All this is a conspiracy.

        1. Jolyon Ralph Avatar
          Jolyon Ralph

          How many weddings do you need to shoot in 8K or 4K120?

          4K30 (or even 1080p) is not good enough?

          1. Camera operator Hong Kong Avatar
            Camera operator Hong Kong

            None,
            but I may start as the camera overheat less in 120 than 30p.
            Thanks for the suggestion!

  2. Dunja Djudjic Avatar
    Dunja Djudjic

    “Not great, not terrible” :D

  3. Chuck Diesel Avatar
    Chuck Diesel

    How in the world does a multi-billion dollar company not do proper testing before releasing a product like this?

    1. Igor Mitrovic Avatar
      Igor Mitrovic

      Why?
      Sony do the same few years in a row and people still live with that.
      They just do the same thing, little better.

      1. Chuck Diesel Avatar
        Chuck Diesel

        It’s good to learn from your own mistakes, but best to learn from other’s. Canon doesn’t seem to be that bright, if they didn’t learn from Sony’s mistake.

  4. Viggo Næss Avatar
    Viggo Næss

    Can’t wait?

  5. James Madara Avatar
    James Madara

    Would a fan have been such a bad idea? You could turn it off when needed for shorter shoots. Most audio is off camera anyway.

  6. Kevin Lane Avatar
    Kevin Lane

    What a description of every product from Canon since the 1Dx

  7. Danilo Knezevic Avatar
    Danilo Knezevic

    Is it possible to somehow unable 120fps 1080p on this camera?

  8. Venelin Atanasov Avatar
    Venelin Atanasov

    Basically it will overheat always in summer

  9. Chainsaw Charlie Avatar
    Chainsaw Charlie

    Is this about overheating or about recording limit? Because, i don’t know why, i can’t believe that it will overheat after exactly 29 minutes and 59 seconds.

  10. Chainsaw Charlie Avatar
    Chainsaw Charlie

    Can anyone recommend a camera (preferably Sony) which can shoot 8K more than 20 minutes without overheating? I want to buy one.

  11. Jolyon Ralph Avatar
    Jolyon Ralph

    As it can do full-frame 4K30 without overheating then I really don’t see what the problem is. You’ll only ever want to do 8K or 4K120 for very short clips anyway.

    If you are seriously wanting to shoot more than 20mins of 8K video at a time you probably either want to invest in a professional 8K camera, or maybe buy 2 or 3 R5 bodies (which may work out cheaper) and cycle through them as they reach their heat limits.

  12. Nick Avatar
    Nick

    With all the overheating issues Canon is letting us know about the EOS-R5, no one is talking about the battery life this camera will have. Looking at the predictions of max 500 shots per charge when in battery saver mode makes my 5D Mark IV more efficient when it comes to wedding photography. Being a wedding photographer I am trying to change batteries as few times as possible, which is almost never when using a grip on my 5D Mark IV but even double 500 is only 1,000 shots per charge on the EOS-R5 and I can easily shoot 1,000 on a DSLR body and still have plenty of battery life left. That being said, I have listened to the electronic shutter and it is almost noiseless, so to some wedding photographers out there it may be worth switching batteries more often in order to be as silent as possible during a wedding ceremony.