Use These Quick Tips From Tamara Lackey To Improve Your Portrait Photography

Dec 28, 2014

Tiffany Mueller

Tiffany Mueller is a photographer and content strategist based in Hawi, Hawaii. Her work has been shared by top publications like The New York Times, Adobe, and others.

Use These Quick Tips From Tamara Lackey To Improve Your Portrait Photography

Dec 28, 2014

Tiffany Mueller

Tiffany Mueller is a photographer and content strategist based in Hawi, Hawaii. Her work has been shared by top publications like The New York Times, Adobe, and others.

Join the Discussion

Share on:

lackey

As you know, taking a compelling portrait is more difficult than just aiming your camera at someone and asking them to smile. There a lot of tiny details that are easy to overlook unless you are purposely keeping tabs on them. That being said, if you’re looking to get into portrait photography or just improve your craft a little more, award winning photographer Tamara Lackey delivers a handful of good tips you can use to do just that.

Simple Things You Can Do To Capture Better Portraits

The title of the video let’s you know there’s at least five useful pointers, but if you’re paying attention, you’ll catch a few bonus tips, too. But, before we get to the video, let’s take a quick look at some the topics covered in the video.

  • Before you start shooting, check and adjust your camera settings–you don’t want to miss any good shots because you were too busy changing the settings.
  • When shooting group photos try to keep faces on the same focal plane, especially when shooting at small apertures, to avoid some of the faces appearing sharp and others appearing soft.
  • Pay attention to catch lights in the subject’s eye. Use a reflector to bounce light onto the subjects faces, keeping the catch lights consistent in all the subject’s eyes and adding the benefit of a little extra light to help fill in some of the shadows on their faces.
  • Increasing the distance between you and your subject will help you get everything in focus when you’re working with a shallow depth of field.
  • If you are shooting in good, natural light make sure you are not standing in between it and your subjects to avoid casting an unwanted shadow into your shot.
  • The rule of thirds will always be there for you, take advantage of that.

5 Photography Tips With Tamara Lackey

[ via Vimeo ]

Find this interesting? Share it with your friends!

Tiffany Mueller

Tiffany Mueller

Tiffany Mueller is a photographer and content strategist based in Hawi, Hawaii. Her work has been shared by top publications like The New York Times, Adobe, and others.

Join the Discussion

DIYP Comment Policy
Be nice, be on-topic, no personal information or flames.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

4 responses to “Use These Quick Tips From Tamara Lackey To Improve Your Portrait Photography”

  1. Sarah Avatar
    Sarah

    Just a quick fix, it’s “large” aperture, not small. Small means that the aperture itself (the hole which lets in light) is small…in which case a lot more is in focus. You meant to write wide or large aperture, such as 1.4-2.8 range where less is in focus.

  2. BIG D Avatar
    BIG D

    Horrible advice. 1,250 ISO and 1/500th of a second with a “normal” focal length? you could have shot a slower shutter speed and a lower ISO to reduce the digital noise. The is no reason why you can’t shoot outside in daylight at 100 ISO.

    1. Amanda Avatar
      Amanda

      I was wondering the exact same thing! Even just cutting the ISO in half would still give a fast enough shutter speed to get the quick movements of children. This makes me think I was doing something wrong because I would never bump my ISO up that high for a day shoot! I was relieved to see your comment and someone else thought the same thing.

    2. ProShooter Avatar
      ProShooter

      Wow “Big D”, did you watch the video or just look at the photo shown here, which was shot by someone else while getting advice? The advice and metadata are different, if you actually watch the video. May also want to learn that there are more than a few reasons pros shoot outside in daylight at ISO besides 100.