This tribute to Interstellar takes us from a black hole to the Big Bang

Nov 24, 2017

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

This tribute to Interstellar takes us from a black hole to the Big Bang

Nov 24, 2017

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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In 2014 movie Interstellar, Christopher Nolan managed to create the first scientifically accurate black hole. Some sources claim it’s not the case, but nevertheless – I think the movie and the special effects are fantastic. This movie has inspired filmmaker Thomas Vanz to create a short film named INTRA, which takes you on a journey from a black hole to the Big Bang in only four minutes.

Inspired by the “White Hole Theory” and Interstellar, Thomas created this abstract, immersive video using mainly practical effects and chemical reactions. And the final result is impressive.

As Thomas explains, “INTRA tells the visual story of this theory, a journey from the black to the white hole, a cosmic tale of death and birth.” It proposes a vision of the most extreme and one of the most impressive objects of our Universe:

“We don’t know yet what is inside a black hole, we know it is a singularity, a point where every rule of physics collapse. One of the possibilities is called ‘The White Hole Theory,’ a sort of exit from the black hole, a point where everything is born, including space and time. Some compare it to the Big Bang.”

When it comes to creating INTRA, Thomas made it using mainly practical effects. He used different liquids and chemical reactions and shot them on a micro level. In the video below, you can see some BTS footage. This will give you a better idea what the process looked like.

Thomas collaborated with several other artists: Nano Lab helped him create and direct the “white hole” part of the movie. As he explains, they tried to reach the most amazing microscopic shot of what the Big Bang should look like with a unique chemical reaction. Dutch developer Pim Schreurs helped to code an accurate simulation of what the black hole’s gravitational lensing would look like. As for the music, Jonathan Fitas and Thomas’ friend Julien Marchal helped him compose and record the melody for the movie.

Thomas explains this is one of the most ambitious and the most complex pieces he’s ever worked on. I am not even remotely good at science and I have no idea how accurate his visualization is. But all I know is that his vision, skill and effort led to an immersive piece I watched multiple times.

For more of Thomas’ work, make sure to visit his website, Instagram, Facebook, Vimeo and YouTube channel.

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Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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2 responses to “This tribute to Interstellar takes us from a black hole to the Big Bang”

  1. Mark Niebauer Avatar
    Mark Niebauer

    Keep in mind Black Holes are still theoretical. . .

    1. Fiersthe Avatar
      Fiersthe

      Yes, but through observational evidence there is something disrupting the stars located in the center of our galaxy. And astronomers think it is a supermassive blackhole. Currently, they are trying to get a picture composed of radio wavelength of this supermassive black hole Sagittarious A*. We’ll see if they can prove this theory in a couple of years or so. Also data gathered by LIGO, they can also detect their existence from gravitational waves caused by their massive collisions.