This is the first hands-on look at Zeiss’s new Android-powered ZX1 with built-in Lightroom

Dec 23, 2018

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

This is the first hands-on look at Zeiss’s new Android-powered ZX1 with built-in Lightroom

Dec 23, 2018

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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When Zeiss announced the Android-powered ZX1 back in September, It was met with a bit of a mixed reaction, and a lot of questions. No card slots? Why put Lightroom in a camera? Can the screen even be calibrated? How does the CC subscription factor into this? And, is it actually any good?

Well, Zeiss have put out the first video covering the use of the new camera. To do so, they enlisted the help of German freelance photographer Sabrina Weniger, in the streets of Düsseldorf’s Little Tokyo.

Weniger is a portrait and journalism photographer. So she’s ideally suited to spend a few weeks with the ZX1 on the streets of Little Tokyo. And although the video is quite short at two minutes and nineteen seconds, she covers a lot of topics.

For me, the most important thing is that ultimately the pictures are qualitatively the best possible. That means the look must right, teh colours have to hold true and the autofocus needs to work. Those are the basics of photography I need and they must be perfect. I had always hoped that Zeiss would enter the camera market and when that happened, I thought it was great and of course I was fired up.

As a camera, Weniger says that the ZX1 is “super-intuitive to use” and remarks on the size of the screen. She notes that the camera has few gimmicks, although one might argue that being Android-powered and running Lightroom might both turn out to be a bit of a gimmick depending on how well everything’s implemented.

As far as editing goes, Weniger touched briefly on Lightroom and how it allows her to do everything without having to go to a computer. But she didn’t go too much into it other than to say that it was “awesome”.

Should I just choose one and transfer it to the Lightroom? I can really do everything here. That’s so aweseome. Ultimately, the camera will be a camera for my daily use. I always have a camera with me anyway. I take it out right at the moment I see a situation I want to photograph. I’m not distracted. It’s certainly a smooth process.

It looks like a pretty huge camera, although with many complaining about the ergonomics of tiny mirrorless bodies from the likes of Sony, that might not be a bad thing. But it doesn’t look too unwieldy.

There aren’t many sample shots in the video, but no doubt we’ll start to see more of those as the ZX1 gets closer to release. And that’s expected to happen at some point during early 2019.

[via Photo Rumors]

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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One response to “This is the first hands-on look at Zeiss’s new Android-powered ZX1 with built-in Lightroom”

  1. Tj Ó Seamállaigh Avatar
    Tj Ó Seamállaigh

    I don’t call myself professional at all, but from experience in the tech life in general, camera or computer software, I always think it is not a good idea to merge various capabilities or options/missions into one place. As the old proverb says: Do not place all of your eggs in one basket. From this video, yes it might be useful for those who are shooting on the-go and need a quick fix and such rapid tasks, but anyone buying this should really ask themselves: What is the nature of my photography field in the first place? Do I really need it? Does it serve me well? If we look at the bigger picture, it does look like a phone camera without the phone really (with of course advanced capabilities) – Yet, I don’t think a thorough precise job with any photo (shooting and processing) would do much with such a camera. Facing your computer and working through the process of an image has its magic as well (and its points of mind-focus).