These are three essential lenses for landscape photography

Jun 12, 2018

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

These are three essential lenses for landscape photography

Jun 12, 2018

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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When we speak of landscape photography lenses, the first thought for many photographers will be wide angle lenses. In this video, Nigel Danson shows you that it’s not only about wide angles. He suggests three lenses essential for landscape photography, which will provide you with plenty of versatility and creative options.

Super wide

As I mentioned, wide angle lenses are almost synonymous with landscape photography. Nigel’s favorites are the 16-35mm f/4 for Nikon and the 10-24mm f/4 for Fuji. One of the most obvious benefits of lenses with such a wide angle of view is that they present you with a different perspective on things. Another is that it’s easy to get everything in focus without having to calculate the hyperfocal distance for your scene.

Nifty fifty

If you ask me, you can use a nifty-fifty in almost any situation. We’ve seen amazing landscape photos by Timmy Smalls taken only with this lens. I also enjoy shooting landscapes with the 50mm. Nigel likes it because it makes you think about composition a little bit more by limiting yourself to a single focal length. In addition, 50mm primes usually have great optics so you’ll get splendid image quality. They also usually have a large aperture, which gives you great bokeh.

Nigel uses a Sigma 50mm ART f/1.4 on his Nikon and the XF35mm f/2 on his Fuji camera.

Zoom

And finally, a long zoom lens can also be great for landscape photography, although it wouldn’t be the first choice of many photographers. It lets you cut out specific elements of landscape, giving you minimalistic images. Lenses such as a 70-200mm compress the background and give you more creativity and versatility. Nigel talks about this here, and he really likes using telephoto lenses for his landscape photography. His preferred models are the Nikon 70-200m f/2.8 and the Fuji 50-140mm f/2.8.

What do you think? Are these three types of lenses what every landscape photographer should have in a gear bag? What’s your  lens for landscape photography? Share your thoughts in the comments below.

[3 ESSENTIAL lenses for landscape photography (and how to use them) |Nigel Danson]

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Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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3 responses to “These are three essential lenses for landscape photography”

  1. Zygmunt Zarzecki Avatar
    Zygmunt Zarzecki

    Tamron 70-200, Tamron 10-24. And Pentax K-3.

  2. Lars Oeschey Avatar
    Lars Oeschey

    that’s not the “1st generation” 70-200, it already has VR, it’s 3rd generation ;)

  3. Randy Dalton Avatar
    Randy Dalton

    My on camera lens is the Nikon 24-120mm f/4.0. Since I generally shoot landscapes, it works great for me. I seldom need the reach of a 200mm, but I have the 80-400mm f/4.5-5.6 if I need to get out there and the 16-35 f/4.0 if I need a bit wider. Though sometimes I think I should have gone with one that had a little bit more at the bottom. Nevertheless, I’m happy.