Phottix releases a new type of stackable light stands

Jul 12, 2019

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

Phottix releases a new type of stackable light stands

Jul 12, 2019

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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Phottix has just announced Padat Compact (300cm/118″) light stands. These all-purpose flat stackable stands are super-compact and lightweight, designed to make transport and storage easier and to take up minimal space.

YouTube video

There are other stackable light stands on the market, such as these by Manfrotto. However, their mechanisms differ. The Phottix Padat Compact stands feature an innovative Fast Assembly Mortise Module (FAMM). This makes them the first reverse style stands to include a stackable clip together design.

As I mentioned and as the name says, the Phottix Padat Compact comes in a compact size, which enables easy storage and transport. But other than this, we can say that it’s also modular. You can buy the stands together or separately and connect them according to your needs.

Here are the specs:

  • Maximum Height: 3,000mm (118”)
  •  Collapsed Length: 870mm
  •  Collapsed Dimension: 870x80x70mm
  •  Tube Diameters: 29.5, 26, 22.5, 19mm
  •  Footprint Diameters: 1,200mm
  •  Thread: 1/4″ Thread
  •  Stand Weight: 2,100g
  •  Supports: 5 kg

The Phottix Padat 300cm Compact Light Stands are available now from the Phottix Store for $72 per piece.

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Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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10 responses to “Phottix releases a new type of stackable light stands”

  1. Rafael A. P. Maduro Avatar
    Rafael A. P. Maduro

    i just score two pbl stands for 70$ but ill def buy this ones as well they look sturdy

  2. Marko Avatar
    Marko

    I am actually amazed at the price. We are all used to see new things coming out only to gawk at the inflated ludicrous price tag that attached to them. I have had the similar manfrotto legs for around 8 years now and they work very well. I bought them just a bit over the price of those Phottix stands.

    Although this is good value, for just simple stands, one would do just fine with any light stand on Ebay or AliExpress.

    1. John Avatar
      John

      “. . . one would do just fine with any light stand on Ebay or AliExpress.”

      I’ve been around the block a couple of times regarding light stands and two studios I did some work for as I acquired my own lighting gear a couple decades ago. Mixed in with a few decent ones (for their price), there’s a massive amount of cheap junk on ePrey and AliExpress that will fall apart after a half-dozen uses. One studio owner learned his lesson the hard way, and it was one I took to heart as I acquired my own stands. Quality doesn’t have to be expensive but you can waste a lot of money trying to save some in the bargain basement which requires considerable research to wade through all the chaff.

      1. Marko Avatar
        Marko

        Good point. I used the word “any” very loosely and it was a bit of an error. I would buy Neewer stands and products for example and not just from anyone.

        What I meant is that you do not have to spend a fortune for a good product. I have over 12 stands an although the Manfrotto’s offer excellent quality, many of my other stads ar from all kind of companies all (some are Chinese brand like Neewer).

        When I bought a couple of stands or my speedlights I was not about to spend a lot of money on them. I found them on AllExpress for around $25 CDN and so far (more than five years later, they are doing great. They are light and small and used for location shoot only.

        However, as I said, those above are great value.

  3. Nikola Radovani Avatar
    Nikola Radovani

    So yesterday,? check out older Manfrotto products

  4. Jeff Wasserman Avatar
    Jeff Wasserman

    These look great but I wish they supported more weight. A Profoto D2 is 7.5 lbs., add a modifier and you are maxed out (10 lbs max) without even thinking about a small boom or stabilizing weight. I would love something compact like this for location but this unfortunately won’t be it.

  5. Taylor Maduro Port Avatar
    Taylor Maduro Port

    Kupo click stands

  6. Michał Luboń Avatar
    Michał Luboń

    Manfrotto did it long time ago.

  7. Don Barnard Avatar
    Don Barnard

    NEW???? my old manfrotto stackers are awesome…

  8. John Avatar
    John

    I’m not enthralled by the reverse leg concept on these. I’ve seen this type of design and it’s not as stable as tubular legs with a double strut. Manfrotto (Bogen in the U.S. until a few years ago) used this on some extremely short stands intended for light duty such as background and kicker lights. If fully extended they tend to wobble, and on-location people step on them versus walking around them, especially after they’ve been drinking for a while, which isn’t good for the light stand and its stability. It’s hard enough protecting background and light stands at events where there’s a bar serving liquor. If the center is raised some, the stand tends to twist much more easily and you have a smaller footprint with less tipping stability. The max weight load specs reflect that and I’d want higher for use with a large softbox (e.g. 3ft x 4ft). Regarding stacking, Bogen/Manfrotto has been doing it for years. I’ve seen it more a gimmick and a marginal feature. If you’re hauling strobes (e.g. monolights), the trolley will accommodate stands for them.

    There’s nothing new here other than the specific stacking mechanism design (they’d have trouble if they copied Manfrotto’s). It’s certainly not the the reverse blade legs or the stacking concepts. If weight isn’t a big issue, or if stacking isn’t a necessity, Neewer is selling a pair of ten-footers for about the same price as one of these. That said, the price is still competitive for what it is – but I’d not be looking at this leg design for a ten-foot stand.