Photographers, don’t fall into this trap with Instagram

Jun 28, 2019

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

Photographers, don’t fall into this trap with Instagram

Jun 28, 2019

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

Join the Discussion

Share on:

Instagram is a useful tool for photographers who want to share their work with the world. While this medium can be great to reach out to your viewers, it hides potential traps you can fall into. In this video, Jamie Windsor discusses one of his problems with Instagram and explains how it can negatively affect your work if you limit yourself to it.

YouTube video

Depending on how you use it, Instagram can be a fantastic tool and a pure waste of time and energy. Just like any other social network, for that matter. As photographers, I believe many of you use it to share your work with a wider audience. After all, it definitely is the easiest way to reach out to hundreds, thousands, even millions of people. However, the problem arises when you limit yourself to Instagram only.

Jamie says that most people he photographs in the street ask him how they can find him on Instagram. In other words, it seems like this has become the default way of sharing photos. As photographers, this is the trap we shouldn’t fall into. Instagram can be a good way, but definitely not the only way to share our images.

If you haven’t printed your photos, do it. Make small prints, make large ones, and even experiment with unusual methods like this one. Printing your photos will make it understand your own work better, see new details and observe it from a different point of view. Instagram should be a tool for you, just like the lens or the camera you use – but it shouldn’t be the only way of sharing and seeing your own work. As Jamie puts it, tools are there “to help realize our creative vision, not to define it.”

[The INSTAGRAM PROBLEM for PHOTOGRAPHERS | Jamie Windsor]

Filed Under:

Tagged With:

Find this interesting? Share it with your friends!

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

Join the Discussion

DIYP Comment Policy
Be nice, be on-topic, no personal information or flames.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

2 responses to “Photographers, don’t fall into this trap with Instagram”

  1. Michael Bray Avatar
    Michael Bray

    Making prints no matter the size is the best way of viewing your work, it gives you a different perspective and lets you see ways you could have took the shot different or ways to edit the photo before reprinting it and displaying it. It also let’s you narrow down exactly what photos truly are your best and worthy of being displayed for others to enjoy. I personally make 8X10 and 8.5×11 prints of my favourite photos from each shoot that I do, that way I can see if they need a slight touch up before I display them.

  2. Nick Stameres Avatar
    Nick Stameres

    Yes! Instagram is way over-valued. So much of the exposure and praise is bought and paid for. Bad photos abound. Everyone wants to be followed but doesn’t want to follow back! So absurd.