How to stop making these five beauty photography mistakes

Feb 14, 2024

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

How to stop making these five beauty photography mistakes

Feb 14, 2024

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

Join the Discussion

Share on:

YouTube video

In beauty photography, light, makeup, and expression come together to create fantastic portraits. And if you’re just starting out, you know how it goes: you’re making mistakes. But worry not, it’s all fixable! In her latest video, Kayleigh June shares her experience on five common mistakes you may be making as a beauty photographer – and teaches you how to fix them.

Mistake #1: The unwanted glow

Silver and gold reflectors might seem like the go-to tools for reflecting light but it’s not always the case. While they can create specific stylistic effects, their impact on skin tones can be less than ideal. Silver can leave a metallic sheen, while gold casts an orange hue that might not flatter every complexion.

The fix: Your 5-in-1 reflector also has the white part – opt for that one! It diffuses light just right, resulting in softer, more natural-looking skin tones that complement most subjects. Remember, you can always break the rules for a unique style, but understanding the “why” behind each choice empowers you to make deliberate artistic decisions.

Mistake #2: The looming shadow

Those unwanted shadows creeping onto your backdrop can be an eyesore. Not only do they distract from the model, but they also scream “amateur hour.” So, how do you get rid of them?

The fix: It’s all about positioning your model and your lighting. Move your model a few steps forward to create a clean separation between them and the backdrop. Alternatively, adjust your lighting setup to eliminate the shadows. Remember, lighting is your sculpting tool, so play with its angles and intensity to achieve the desired effect.

Mistake #3: Balancing the light poorly

Lighting is the backbone of beauty photography, but striking the right balance can sometimes be tricky. Light that’s too high or too low can lead to a flat, featureless look, harsh shadows, or lack of definition.

The fix: Kayleigh advises you to embrace the “butterfly lighting.” Position your light source higher and angled down towards the model’s face. This creates flattering shadows around the nose and cheekbones, emphasizing their natural beauty. Experiment with different heights, angles, and lighting patterns to find the sweet spot that complements your subject’s unique features. And be aware of the next mistake while making your lighting setup:

Mistake #4: The “one-size-fits-all” lighting

Every face is a unique canvas, and a one-size-fits-all lighting approach simply won’t do. What flatters one model might leave another looking washed out.

The fix: Embrace the power of observation. In other words, before the shoot, Kayleigh advises you to study the model’s features and their previous photos. Ask yourself: what lighting seems to highlight their best assets? Analyze the photos and the model’s facial features and use this knowledge to tailor your setup. Don’t be afraid to experiment with modifiers like black or white foam boards or V-flats to absorb or reflect light, creating a customized lighting setup for each individual.

Mistake #5: Overusing wide-angle lenses

Wide-angle lenses are fantastic for capturing landscapes, but they’re not your best friend in beauty photography. Their inherent distortion can exaggerate facial features in unflattering ways. At the same time, they limit your ability to capture those close-up details that showcase the beauty in the imperfections.

The fix: Unless the distinctive wide-angle look is a deliberate artistic choice, Kayleigh suggests embracing longer lenses. Lenses with focal lengths above 85mm will be your best friends. They compress facial features, creating a more flattering look, and allow you to get closer and capture details like eye texture and subtle expressions. Remember, beauty lies in the details!

In the end, remember: these are just guidelines, not rigid rules. As Kayleigh emphasizes, the beauty of photography lies in experimentation and expressing your unique vision. So, don’t be afraid to think out of the box, but do it with an understanding of the potential drawbacks and consequences.

[Mistakes You’re Making with Beauty Photography | Kayleigh June]

Find this interesting? Share it with your friends!

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

Join the Discussion

DIYP Comment Policy
Be nice, be on-topic, no personal information or flames.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *