Hollyland’s first digital wireless microphone, the Lark 150, charges itself when not in use

Dec 3, 2020

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Hollyland’s first digital wireless microphone, the Lark 150, charges itself when not in use

Dec 3, 2020

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Join the Discussion

Share on:

Hollyland has become rather popular for its video transmission systems. We’ve reviewed some of them here on DIYP before and they’ve performed rather well, especially given their price. But now they’re branching out into audio with the launch of their new dual wireless 2.4Ghz microphone, the Lark 150.

It makes sense for a company like Hollyland to add audio into their lineup. With as much kit beaming signals into the air as there are these days, it can be difficult to find equipment that plays well with others. So, one company making both audio and video transmission systems can ensure they work seamlessly together without interfering with each other.

YouTube video

As seems to have become the standard now ever since Rode released the Wireless GO then Synco with their super-low-budget G1, the Lark 150 is a small squashed-cube-like design, which clips onto your clothing or wherever you want to clip it onto. Each transmitter also contains a 3.5mm audio jack for plugging in a microphone if you’d prefer to use a more traditional lav mic wirelessly, instead of the built-in microphone in the transmitter.

Frequency2.4Ghz
Range100m
Latency5ms
Dynamic range100dBa
Encryption128-Bit
Max units per setup8
Tx typeLavalier
Tx displaynone
Tx micBuilt-in omnidirectional or 3.5mm TRS input
Tx mic frequency response20Hz – 20KHz
Tx battery200mAh
Tx battery life4.5hrs
Tx charging time1.5hrs
Tx dimensions37x37x17.5mm
Tx weight20.5g
Rx typeBelt clip/on-camera
Rx displayOLED
Rx interface1 x 3.5mm TRS line out, 1x 3.5m headset interface
Rx audio output range21-state: 45dB
Rx battery530mAh
Rx battery life7.5h
Rx charging time2h
Rx dimensions67x41x20.5mm
Rx weight51g
Case interface1x Type-C USB Interface
Case powerBuilt-in battery or DC power
Case battery3350mAh
Case charging time2.5h
Case dimensions121x61x43.5mm
Case weight227.5g

Unlike other systems of similar designs, the receiver for the Hollyland Lark 150 is a little more evolved, offering individual gain control dials and remote monitoring with an OLED display for each of your two transmitters. The receiver mounts on top of your camera and offers both line output to go into your camera or field recorder as well as a headphone output so you can monitor the sound even if your camera doesn’t have a headphone jack.

Also interesting is the case it comes supplied with, which essentially doubles up as a charging station for all three devices – the receiver and both transmitters. This is something I haven’t seen in this level and type of microphone before. Usually, you have to juggle multiple USB cables to keep everything topped up, but with this, you just put the items into the box and away they charge.

The transmitters last up to 4.5 hours on a full charge of their built-in 200mAh battery. The receiver features a 530mAh battery that lasts up to 7.5 hours. The case itself has a 3350mAh battery built-in, meaning that as long as you’re leaving the house with everything fully charged, you shouldn’t have any power issues throughout an entire day’s shoot.

With a claimed 5ms latency at up to 100m range, dual transmitters and 2.4Ghz wireless transmission, it’s an impressive looking system on paper. It’ll be great to see these in the hands of people soon for some real-world reviews of the performance compared to the other systems out there right now.

The Hollyland Lark 150 dual wireless microphone system is available to pre-order now for $329 and has already started shipping to distributors and retailers around the world.

Inside the box you get the case, one receiver, two transmitters, a TRS cable to go to your camera, a couple of regular 3.5mm lavalier microphones along with two windshields, and a Type-A to Type-C cable for charging your case.

Filed Under:

Tagged With:

Find this interesting? Share it with your friends!

John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Join the Discussion

DIYP Comment Policy
Be nice, be on-topic, no personal information or flames.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

2 responses to “Hollyland’s first digital wireless microphone, the Lark 150, charges itself when not in use”

  1. Marc Langenberg Avatar
    Marc Langenberg

    ugly.

    1. Kaouthia Avatar
      Kaouthia

      No more so than similar microphones from other companies. And if you don’t have it in the shot, why does it matter what it looks like?