The entire start to finish process to make ultra large format wet plate photographs

Nov 16, 2017

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

The entire start to finish process to make ultra large format wet plate photographs

Nov 16, 2017

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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Despite picking up a little in popularity in the last year or two, wet plate photography is still quite an alien process to many photographers. More and more information about it pops up onto the web every day. What I’ve not seen, though, until now, is an entire start to finish video or article which details the entire process.

Thankfully, photographer Markus Hofstätter has done exactly that, in this video. So that you don’t miss out on any of the process, he shot the whole thing in 360° with his Insta360 camera for the complete surround experience. So, throw on your headsit, sit back, and have a watch.

YouTube video

Markus tells DIYP that the shoot itself was in a historical museum photo studio that’s been around since 1881 in the Czech Republic. When you watch the 360 footage, and look around as Markus moves from room to room, it’s a fantastic looking place.

While there is some live audio from the shoot itself, it’s largely voiceover. Markus explains his thoughts and process. And it’s not just a straight A-Z tutorial, either. Markus actually explains the reasons for some of his choices. The way he does things that might not be typical to other wet plate photographers. Like, why he uses developing trays to sensitise his plates instead of pouring the liquid straight on.

I know wet plate photography is basically just the right mix of chemistry and physics. But it still feels a little magical, every time I watch somebody do it. Especially when the final results look so great.

If you don’t want to watch the full 360° video above, here’s a shortened, condensed, flat version.

YouTube video

You can check out a few more photos of the process and results over on Markus’ website.

Wet plate photography is something I’ve wanted to try for such a long time. But, I know if I try it, I’ll get hooked and spend a fortune. It’ll happen one day, though.

 

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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5 responses to “The entire start to finish process to make ultra large format wet plate photographs”

  1. MH Photography Avatar
    MH Photography

    Thanks for featuring my videos!!!

  2. Markus Hofstätter Avatar
    Markus Hofstätter

    Thanks for featuring my videos John!!!

  3. Jimmy Harris Avatar
    Jimmy Harris

    Do more articles like this! This is why we come to DIYphotography!

  4. Ralph Hightower Avatar
    Ralph Hightower

    Wet plate photography is something that I also want to try.

    1. Markus Hofstätter Avatar
      Markus Hofstätter

      Join one of my workshops, if you sometimes plan to visit Austria.
      That’s what my recent one looked like: https://youtu.be/UQmw2O0UURU