These cooking videos shot in the styles of famous directors are just beautiful and hilarious.

Aug 16, 2017

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

These cooking videos shot in the styles of famous directors are just beautiful and hilarious.

Aug 16, 2017

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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Cooking videos tend to follow a fairly strict recipe (pun intended). First, we’re introduced to the ingredients. Then they dice, chop and mix a few things up. Finally, they pull one out of the oven that they “prepared earlier” that’s been cooking away for a couple of hours. For some celebrity chefs, there’s even the occasional bit of profanity thrown in for good measure.

What if we ditched the reality show style of Kitchen Nightmares, or the studioesque kitchens of Jamie Oliver? What if they were directed by Michael Bay or Quentin Tarantino? A neat thought, huh? Well, these cooking videos from food artist and director David Ma illustrate exactly that. They’re brilliantly put together, and absolutely hilarious.

What if Tarantino made spaghetti & meatballs?

YouTube video

What if Michael Bay made waffles?

YouTube video

What if Wes Anderson made s’mores?

YouTube video

What if Alfonso Cuaron made pancakes?

YouTube video

I can actually imagine that that’s exactly what would be like to watch Quentin Tarantino cook spaghetti and meatballs.

They really are brilliantly put together. The music, obviously, fits with each piece, but the camera movement, slow motion, editing, gravity defying effects and blood spatters. It all just comes together wonderfully. So far, only these four videos exist on David’s channel, but I really hope this isn’t the end of the series.

I’d love to see Ridley Scott make a full English breakfast. In the style of either Alien or Blade Runner. Either would be fine with me. Or perhaps James Cameron making a nice steak. Terminator-style, obviously.

[via FStoppers]

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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2 responses to “These cooking videos shot in the styles of famous directors are just beautiful and hilarious.”

  1. Aankhen Avatar
    Aankhen

    I haven’t seen the pancakes video, so I can’t comment on that, but the others were quite disappointing. They’re not even surface-level parodies. They replicate one or two aspects of each filmmaker’s work which, taken in isolation like this, don’t create the same effect.

  2. Maria Giese Avatar
    Maria Giese

    These mini cooking videos are a lot of fun– and they are also a kind of celebration of the concept of the “auteur director.” Male auteur directors are beloved and revered in our society. I have never heard of an woman director referred to an “auteur.” I wonder who John Aldred would choose if he did one of these based on a women director? I mean this a challenge, not a criticism.