Aputure “Unleashes the Sun” announcing availability of its new Light Storm 1200D Pro LED light

Feb 25, 2022

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Aputure “Unleashes the Sun” announcing availability of its new Light Storm 1200D Pro LED light

Feb 25, 2022

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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First announced last September, Aputure has now officially released its Light Storm 1200D Pro flagship LED light. With 1200 Watts of power, Aputure claimed at the time of its initial announcement that it was the “highest output Bowens Mount light fixture on the market”. While not the only light fixture at 1200W, it’s true that it was the only one at that kind of level with a Bowens mount making it ideally suited to your existing Bowens modifiers.

This daylight-balanced light comes with three reflectors for wide, medium and narrow beams and the whole setup is shipped in two separate cases; One for the light and one for the reflectors. Handy, as you don’t have to cart an oversized case everywhere if you don’t need to use the reflectors and cart them around with you everywhere. It’s been a long wait, but now it’s available to buy!

YouTube video

When it comes to raw power output, the LS1200D puts out 6,3480 lux at 3 metres when completely bare, which goes up to 9,610 lux with the wide (55°) reflector, 22,400 lux with the medium (30°) reflector and an extremely bright 83,100 lux with the narrow (15°) reflector. It’s dust and water-resistant (not waterproof!) and has a CRI and TLCI of 96+ and 98+ respectively.

It’s target to replace on film and video sets are the more traditional HMI and Tungsten “hot” lights that have been in the industry for decades. LEDs are able to put out a lot more light compared to the power they consume and don’t require constant bulb replacements. They’re also a lot easier to gel and add modifiers to because while they’re still going to get warm at those kinds of power levels, they’re not even close to traditional Tungsten bulbs.

Connectivity support includes CRMX, Art-net and SaCN via etherCON and 5-pin DMX512. Of course, you also get remote control with Aputure’s Sidus Link app control system. Power is supplied through either an AC cable or via two 48v 15A DC inputs for half or full power. When you’re not controlling it remotely, the power setting can be altered from the controller and you also get eight different lighting effects (Paparazzi, Fireworks, Lightning, Faulty Bulb, TV, Pulsing, Strobe and Explosion) as well as four dimming curves and four fan modes for when shooting requires an absolutely silent set.

The Aputure Light Storm 1200D Pro is available to buy now for $3,390 although everywhere currently still seems to be awaiting stock that’s on the way. So, while it’s not technically still a pre-order, you might have to wait a little while for it to arrive.

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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5 responses to “Aputure “Unleashes the Sun” announcing availability of its new Light Storm 1200D Pro LED light”

  1. Fredrick H. Avatar
    Fredrick H.

    With 1200 Watts of power! OMG!

  2. panimus Avatar
    panimus

    It would be nice, in articles like this, where the comparison particularly references older style, but still very current, tungsten “hot lights,” to actually give us a meaningful comparison of light output. So, what does lux or foot candles mean relative to the watts of tungsten lights? I have no idea how bright this new light is in relation to a 1K – why not include this information? There is no common reference to brightness! You might as well say, “wow, it’s bright”! Relative to what? or relative to watt?

    We have been using “watts” as a reference for years for tungsten lights, how do lux/fc compare? The “watts” of LEDs certainly don’t compare. Do I have to actually see the lights in person or side by side (LED to a 1K for example) to sort this out? While this LED seems interesting I have no clue how bright it is.

    1. Kaouthia Avatar
      Kaouthia

      If I’d actually had the Light Storm 1200D in my possession at the time of writing, I would’ve done actual meter readings to be able to provide such information in the the post. To be honest, though, if you’re really in the target market for this kind of light, you likely already have at least some experience with its current and past contemporaries and would already be able to figure this out based on that experience. Foot candles is an industry standard way of measuring light output in the movies (as well as architecture, horticulture, museums and galleries, and plenty of other industries) and has been for decades.

      But for some comparison… Pure unfiltered sunlight on the brightest of bright days is around 10,000 fc. An overcast day is around 100 fc. Indoor residential lighting is around 5-40 fc. Lighting for commercial spaces is around 200 fc. It’s all easy to look up on the web. :)

      1. panimus Avatar
        panimus

        When I buy a replacement bulb for my industry standard fresnel 1K, it says 1K watts on the box with no mention of foot candles. I’ve never head them say on set: “Bring out the 10,000 FC” have you? More like “Get the 5,000 K HMI” which is watts, just FYI.

        And since when do manufacturers want to limit their marketing reach by using more narrow definitions exclusively? Maybe thoughtless ones?

        And google is not helpful for this sort of comparison because of the variables, even within this actual light’s own description with the different modifiers. I see no need to make this more complicated when we have a general sense of what a 100 or 1000 watt bulb outputs. It’s called a widely acceptable reference point. Even the other comment referenced watts! As I said, I have no clue how bright this thing is.

        1. Kaouthia Avatar
          Kaouthia

          So contact Aputure and ask them?