Three things you should know before you start photography

May 29, 2018

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

Three things you should know before you start photography

May 29, 2018

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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So, you’re into photography, you want to get your first camera and get serious about it. There is plenty to learn and it’s an incredible, creative journey. And before you start, Pierre T. Lambert shares three things he wishes he knew before starting photography. These may help you make right decisions when choosing which gear to buy, but also help you take better shots.

YouTube video

1. Lenses are more important than your camera body

Many new photographers ask which camera they should buy. It’s nice to have a good camera body, but what’s even more important is having a good lens. Pierre compares it to a window: having a crappy lens is like looking through an old and dirty window. And if you buy a good, high-quality lens, your camera sensor will pick up a nice, clean and sharp image, like when you look through a clean window. Interesting analogy.

Anyway, it’s good to know that you don’t need to spend a fortune to upgrade from a kit lens. You can get a 50mm (Sony, Nikon, Canon) for $100-$200, it’s a good start.

2. Minimum shutter speed lock

The minimum shutter speed lock function is something that might spare you a lot of blurry shots. It tells your camera not to shoot below a certain shutter speed. So, when you shoot in the Aperture Priority mode, the camera won’t go below the predefined shutter speed, no matter the conditions you’re in.

Here are some tips how to set the minimum aperture for different situations:

  • A subject that doesn’t move: 1/50 s
  • Slight movement: 1/125 s
  • A walking subject: 1/250 s
  • Action: 1/500 s

3. Editing your photos

Finally, Pierre suggests that you should edit your photos. First of all, shoot raw, so you can extract as many details as possible from your shots. Edit your photos not just by applying Instagram filters or Lightroom presets, but really work on your editing skills. The editing can give a special touch to your work and help you define your style.

Pierre advises you to go over the top when editing and then come back. Always look at the photo a day later, because you may realize that you went too far with the editing, so you can tone it down.

As a beginner, there will be plenty more things you’ll learn over time, and I’m sure you’ll enjoy it. And for you non-beginners, I have a question: what are the things you wish you knew before you started photography?

[3 Things I Wish I Knew BEFORE Starting Photography via ISO 1200]

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Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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2 responses to “Three things you should know before you start photography”

  1. giorgionetg Avatar
    giorgionetg

    2.2 Exist a special relationship between lenses and shutter speed. Don’t set speed lover than mm lens, i.e.:

    50 mm lens – never less of 1/50s
    75mm lens – never less of 1/75s (I mean rounding this number like 1/80s or 1/100s)
    104mm lens – never less of 1/104s (same pattern here 1/150s).

    Last step on lens 8mm / 50mm, get a lot of light more then everything over 100mm. There was also a math function, but I don’t remember.

  2. MegaNickels Avatar
    MegaNickels

    Also don’t ALWAYS use the widest aperture. i know it’s the fad these days but if you use that wide aperture you are going to be missing focus quite a lot. i almost never shoot at anything lower than f4 unless it’s a super dark situation like a concert, night time sports event or if i’m going for a very specific look. If you are a portrait photographer you can still get creamy backgrounds at f4 while keeping a face nice and sharp. man i wish i knew that like 4 years ago.