Sirui boasts one-step height adjustment for upcoming SVT75 Rapid Tripod

Aug 21, 2023

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Sirui boasts one-step height adjustment for upcoming SVT75 Rapid Tripod

Aug 21, 2023

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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If you ask me, this should’ve been a feature that all tripod manufacturers started offering a decade or two ago. I’m talking, of course, about a single lever that lets you lock and unlock the full range of length of your tripod legs in one go.

It’s a feature you typically only see in high-end Flowtech tripods from companies like Sachtler, OConnor and Vinten (all owned by Videndum). Sirui’s SVT75 wants to tackle Flowtech head-on but at a fraction of the price.

YouTube video

Sirui is a name that you don’t see thrown around all that much, except, perhaps, when it comes to anamorphic lenses. But they’ve been a camera accessory manufacturer for a long time and even make products for other brands like Insta360.

They’re known for producing great gear at very affordable prices. And now, they’re looking to do it with higher-end style tripods as they take on products like the Flowtech 75 (buy here). The product hasn’t officially been announced yet, though.

Sirui STV75 – It’s two tripods, not one!

It’s officially to be announced on September 8th and it’ll be coming to Indiegogo. I say “it”, but there are actually two tripods. There’s the Sirui STV75 “Pro” and the Sirui STV75 “Lite”, each of which has its advantages and disadvantages – basically, price vs performance.

Both sets of legs do have a few things in common. They both offer one-step height adjustment, and have carbon fibre legs with a 40mm diameter. They also both provide a 75mm bowl for attaching your head, with a load capacity of 25kg (55.1lb).

Three angle positions of 22º, 50º and 78º are available in both tripods and horseshoe feet with double spikes. Both have the same retracted length (750mm), as well as minimum height (210mm) and maximum height (1530mm). They are supplied in a carrying case with a 6-year warranty.

So, what’s different?

Well, there aren’t many, but they are quite significant. The Lite version is, naturally, a little cheaper. It’s also lighter, at 3.5kg. No mid-level spreader is supplied with the Lite version, either.

“Perk E” containing the Sirui STV75 Pro tripod and SVH15 fluid video head.

For the Pro version, you do get that middle spreader. It’s a bit beefier at 4.5kg and has a “detachable strap” (which looks more like a solid handle in the photos) to make carrying it a little easier.

Other than that, they seem largely identical.

What about Flowtech/Videndum? Doesn’t this infringe?

Other companies have attempted to implement one-touch mechanisms like this before. They’ve released products which have then disappeared from the market a short time later, never to be seen again. This is widely believed to be Videndum (or Vitec, as it was known in the past) enforcing their patents, as is their right.

One such example is the YC Onion Pineta, which appeared last year during IBC in Amsterdam, where we got to see it in person. While the Pineta monopod appears to be available, the Pineta tripod is nowhere to be found if you want to buy one. At the same show, Sachtler also showed off their latest iteration Flowtech 75 tripod.

YouTube video
YouTube video

If rumours of Videndum patent enforcement are true, it will be interesting to see if the same happens here. When Sirui lists their own patent numbers on the marketing materials for the new tripod, and the exclamation “Do Not Infringe!” at the end of it, will Videndum still find fault?

Perhaps Sirui’s found a way around the existing patents to let their method work. But I guess we’ll see what happens.

Having tripods with this ability at such a relatively low price is great. It’s my favourite feature of the Manfrotto (also owned by Videndum/Vitec) 635 Fast Carbon Single tripod (buy here), and I wish more tripods could do it. As I said at the start, this should’ve become normal on tripods years ago.

Price and Availability

Sirui will promote the new tripod on Indiegogo with the Sirui SVH15 fluid video head, announced earlier this year. As such, several packages will be available once the campaign goes live. I’m going to summarise them here.

  • Perk A $399 $549 – This is the Sirui SVT75 Lite tripod
  • Perk B $519 $649 – This is the Sirui SVT75 Pro tripod
  • Perk C $499 $649 – This is the SVH15 fluid video head
  • Perk D $879 $1,099 – Sirui SVT75 Lite + SVH15 Head
  • Perk E $959 $1,199 – Sirui STV75 Pro + SVH15 Head

Campaign prices are shown above, but RRP profiles are also shown with a strikethrough. These prices will become valid once the campaign ends and the tripod goes regular retail.

The campaign is expected to go live on September 8th; no link has yet been published. For now, you can find out more about the Sirui Rapid system, which includes the SVT75 tripods and SVH15 head, on the Sirui website.

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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