Seven quick cinematography lessons that will make you a better filmmaker

Aug 31, 2018

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

Seven quick cinematography lessons that will make you a better filmmaker

Aug 31, 2018

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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If you are into filmmaking, there are plenty of ways to improve your work and to make the shooting more successful and efficient. In this video from StudioBinder, Brent Barbano of ShareGrid gives you seven quick, but very valuable lessons that will help you raise your filmmaking on a higher level.

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1. Just shoot

The first tip is pretty simple: just shoot! You don’t need to have fancy gear, you might as well use a 2009 iPhone. Brent believes that gear doesn’t matter that much, but the idea should come first.

2. Create a plan of action

You can make the shots look great if you have experience, a good team and a good plan of action. You should know exactly what you want to achieve and plan accordingly. It’s also important to communicate clearly with your team: way more important than the gear you shoot with.

3. Use visual references

Make storyboards and mood boards. This way, you’ll give visual references to your ideas and this will make sure that everyone is on the same page about the project.

4. Go tech scouting

Your shoot is only as good as your tech scout.” In other words, location scouting is essential! Always go and scout your shooting locations and check for the things like available lighting, how much space you have, what sounds can be heard at the spot. Also pay attention to parking, available electricity, and all the things that can affect the organization of your shooting.

5. Follow the sun

The sun is a free source of lighting, and if you can use it to your advantage, why not? While location scouting, check out how the sun moves. There are also apps that allow you to follow the sun’s movement throughout the day, so you can use some of them, too.

6. Bring a camera

Bring a camera when you’re location scouting. It can be a smartphone or a small compact camera, but Brent likes bringing a DSLR so he can see how different locations look at different focal lengths. Some look better at wider angles, while the others are better when zoomed in. Alternatively, you can use an app on your smartphone that allows you to select your camera, sensor size and a type of lens and give you an approximate field of view.

7. Trust your instincts and be flexible

When you’re scouting, you can quickly figure out that you might need to change some scenes. Something might not work out as you thought it would, and you may notice some other things that you like and want to incorporate them in your shots. Now’s the time to be flexible and trust your gut. Change what you need to change, because it’s difficult to tweak the plan when the shooting schedule is in place. Still, be ready that things might not go as planned all the time, and be ready to adapt and be flexible during the shooting days, too.

If you’d like to learn more tips and tricks that they don’t teach you in film school, check out this article from StudioBinder, too.

[7 Cinematography Lessons for Filmmakers | StudioBinder]

 

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Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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