SanDisk’s new “Industrial” memory cards are designed for very extreme conditions

Oct 9, 2017

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

SanDisk’s new “Industrial” memory cards are designed for very extreme conditions

Oct 9, 2017

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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We’ve seen memory cards that have survived the wash, explosions, four years in the ocean and more. But as if memory cards weren’t tough enough already, SanDisk just had to go and make them tougher. Their new line of Industrial and Automotive cards designed to stand up to the intense extremes to which they’re exposed.

The Automotive SD is designed for use within vehicles and drones. The Industrial SD, Industrial microSD and Industrial XI are intended for more mainstream use. The standard Industrual can withstand temperatures of between -13°F (-25°C) and 185°F (85°C). While the top end remains the same, the Automotive and Industrial XI cards are rated down to as ridiculous low of -40°F (which is also -40°C).

The cards read and write speeds come in at 80MB/s and 50MB/s respectively. So, while they’re not as fast as some cards, they’re not all that slow, either. They also include a Health Status Monitor, allowing manufacturers to check on card usage and performance levels.

The cards also feature various security enhancements, too. A Host Lock feature allows customers to setup passwords for their cards. This prevents them from being read on unfamiliar devices.

While not really aimed at photographers, I can see these becoming quite useful for extremely cold or heat photographic applications. Long term timelapse in the desert, or arctic wildlife photography expeditions, etc. Of course, in the case of the latter, your camera may freeze up long before your memory card struggles.

Anandtech reports that sample units are out there being tested by OEMs as we speak. There’s no word yet, though, on when they’ll start to appear in our devices, nor exactly in which devices they’ll appear.

It’s interesting to see the direction SanDisk are taking since being taken over by Western Digital. Equally as interesting will be Lexar’s future as it’s now also under new management.

[via Anandtech]

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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9 responses to “SanDisk’s new “Industrial” memory cards are designed for very extreme conditions”

  1. Graeme Simpson Avatar
    Graeme Simpson

    I never realised that cards suffered with the cold. I just thought it was batteries

    1. North Polar Avatar
      North Polar

      Same here. I’ve run my Samsung Pro+ cards down to -65f without issue, so I’m wondering what the deal is.

  2. Daniel Shortt Avatar
    Daniel Shortt

    ??

  3. Svante Ekholm Lindahl Avatar
    Svante Ekholm Lindahl

    Industrial grade SD cards are not new. Lots of companies make great ones, like ATP and Swissbit. It will be interesting to see SanDisk enter the segment.

  4. Alan Amos Avatar
    Alan Amos

    These cards are getting so much like Gillette razors

  5. North Polar Avatar
    North Polar

    Question: what makes them so special about running to those lower temps? Mostly out of curiosity really, as I’ve run my Samsung PRO + cards down to -65f without issue.

  6. Damir Perisa Avatar
    Damir Perisa

    Marketing or real differnece? Show some data, especially as a company to sell data storage devices!

  7. Bill McKenzie Avatar
    Bill McKenzie

    How about some 2933x XQD cards from Sandisk? Not sure the *new* Lexar cards will be any good.