Photoshop’s AI neural filters can tweak age and expression with a few clicks

Oct 21, 2020

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

Photoshop’s AI neural filters can tweak age and expression with a few clicks

Oct 21, 2020

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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Artificial intelligence is quickly becoming an integral part of photo editing software, and Adobe seems to be following the trends. The latest version of Photoshop has been released for desktop and iPad, and it contains an AI-powered feature that lets you tweak your subject’s age, gaze, and facial expression in just a few clicks. But there are a few more new AI-based improvements, so let’s jump in and see what’s new in Photoshop.

We have already covered the Sky Replacement feature powered by Adobe Sensei. It separates the sky from the foreground and lets you change the sky in a few clicks, while also tweaking the lighting in the photo so that it matches the new sky. But there’s another interesting AI addition to Photoshop: Neural Filters. These include a bunch of new filters that let you change all sorts of your image’s features very quickly and easily. Adobe notes that many of them are still in beta, but they have decided to share them with users. This way, you can try them out and give feedback which will help Adobe improve them further.

Neural Filters are non-destructive filters that reduce complex workflows to only a few clicks or sliders. You can use them to change the depth and warmth of your image, relight it, or apply style from one photo onto the other. You can also use it to colorize black and white photos, which is something Adobe introduced as a concept three years ago as a part of Scribbler.

Changing depth and warmth
Relighting the image
Style transfer
Automatic colorization

Another fun part of these beta filters is Smart Portrait. As I mentioned above, you can use it to tweak your subject’s age, expression, pose, colors, gaze, and more. You can even change your subject’s facial features, hair thickness, the intensity of their smile; and add emotions like surprise or anger. Adobe notes that this feature works best if you keep it subtle, but feel free to experiment and see how far you can take it without making it too obvious.

The new features are already being rolled out and you can find out more on Adobe’s website. You can learn more about Neural Filters here.

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Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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3 responses to “Photoshop’s AI neural filters can tweak age and expression with a few clicks”

  1. Carlos D Avatar
    Carlos D

    The 2 faces on the story main page are not the same photo. Two different photos are used! Look at the gap between lower lip and teeth! Why are you trying to deceive readers?

    1. Kard Avatar
      Kard

      Photoshop can do that. It even adds teeth if you want a big happy smile if mouth is closed in the original picture.

  2. Howardo Mansfieldio Avatar
    Howardo Mansfieldio

    The age filter is amazing. I moved the slider all the way to the bottom and it came out like this.