Godox goes even more retro with the 60s-styled Lux Senior on-camera flash

Jul 15, 2022

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Godox goes even more retro with the 60s-styled Lux Senior on-camera flash

Jul 15, 2022

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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Last month, Godox took a walk on the 80s side with the release of the new retro-themed Lux Junior on-camera manual flash. Well, now they’ve gone even more retro, dialling things back another decade or two, with the announcement of a new 60s-themed Godox Lux Senior.

The Godox Lux Senior is styled around one of those satellite dish-looking flashes that fan out with a bulb in the centre. Fortunately, the new Godox Lux Senior doesn’t come with the problems such flashes had in the past – like one-time-use bulbs. Unlike the Lux Junior, which is a far more inconspicuous unit, I think this one’s going to take a special kind of photographer to be seen out in public with it, though!

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As with the Lux Junior, the Lux Senior is a single-pin flash, which means it’ll work on just about any camera system out there from the latest and greatest mirrorless cameras to your 50+-year-old Nikons, Canons, Zenits, Prakticas and whatever else you happen to shoot with. The Lux Senior is much bigger and far more attention-grabbing than the Lux Junior but it does come with some advantages. It’s a little more power and also features a built-in lithium-ion battery that gives up to 150 full power flashes with recycle times of 3 seconds or less.

Godox Lux JuniorGodox Lux Senior
Guide Number12 (ISO100 in metres)14 (ISO100 in metres)
Flash Power7 levels (1/1 – 1/64)7 levels (1/1 – 1/64)
CCT6000K +/-200K6000K +/-200K
Focal Length28mm (fixed)28mm (fixed)
Optical TriggerS1 / S2S1 / S2
Recycle TimeUnknown<3 sec (max power)
Full power flashesUnknown150 per charge
Dimensions73.8 x 50.2 x 71.8mm84 x 114 x 176mm
Weight130g227g

It features the same manual, distance and auto modes as the Lux Junior as well as S1 and S2 optical control modes to have it fire when it sees another one go off. It mounts to the camera’s hotshoe using the single-pin to get the flash signal or you can connect it to any camera you like by using a PC Sync cable. So, it’ll work on your old vintage medium format cameras, too!

Other than the basic “auto” mode there are no automatic exposure or advanced features on this flash. There’s no TTL, no High Speed Sync. It’s just a basic and very simple flash with a retro vibe. If you’re going to a 60s or 70s fancy dress party as a photographer, then maybe this will complete your look, but beyond that, this one’s very “in your face” compared to the Lux Junior. while I’ve thought that a Lux Junior might actually be able to find a place in my bag, I’m not so sure about the Lux Senior.

If you think you might want to add one to yours, though, the Godox Lux Senior is available to pre-order now for $119 and is expected to start shipping in September.

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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