Five ways to speed up your Premiere Pro editing workflow

Dec 15, 2017

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Five ways to speed up your Premiere Pro editing workflow

Dec 15, 2017

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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Adobe Premiere Pro is one of the most popular video editing applications there is. But for newer users it can be a bit overwhelming. Even for experienced users, there’s always things we can do to improve our workflow. In this video, Jordy from Cinecom shows us is five favourite tips for faster editing in Premiere Pro.

YouTube video

Premiere has so many ways of doing the same thing, and often there are features built right into it that eliminate a bunch steps from a workflow. And that’s mostly what this video’s about, speeding up the workflow to save time. If you can do something automatically or just with one or two clicks of the mouse instead of a dozen, it’s going to do exactly that.

  • 0:14 – Selection follows playhead (automatic clip selection)
  • 1:30 – Track heigh presets
  • 2:32 – Ripple Trim to next/previous edit
  • 3:40 – Transition templates
  • 4:35 – Cutting to the beat with markers

Each tip might only save you 3-5 seconds from the way you normally do it, but over the course of a whole edit, that time adds up really quickly, especially if you need to go back and make tweaks.

I use Premiere for my own video editing, and a couple of these tips I already use, like the ripple trim and the markers trick for cutting to music. That first one, though, I hadn’t seen before. I’ll definitely have to turn that one on.

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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