How To Find Inspiration And Take Interesting Photos In Boring Locations

Dec 14, 2014

Tiffany Mueller

Tiffany Mueller is a photographer and content strategist based in Hawi, Hawaii. Her work has been shared by top publications like The New York Times, Adobe, and others.

How To Find Inspiration And Take Interesting Photos In Boring Locations

Dec 14, 2014

Tiffany Mueller

Tiffany Mueller is a photographer and content strategist based in Hawi, Hawaii. Her work has been shared by top publications like The New York Times, Adobe, and others.

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Regardless of where you live, chances are there’s some really incredible places to take photos nearby. The problem is, after looking at and photographing the same thing over and over again, it becomes increasingly difficult for us to see the beauty in it anymore. As a photographer, having the ability to find inspiration in the most boring, redundant, or even cliched locations is invaluable.

It’s frustrating, but, fortunately not all is lost. In the video below, Mike Brown invites us into his own backyard, a place he’s photographed a 1000 different ways already, to show us a few methods he uses to get the creative juices flowing when our eyes can’t see beyond routine.

Quick Tips To Help You Find Photos

As convenient as it would be, an interesting composition won’t always be obvious. Some times you’ll just have to go looking for it. Here’s a few pointers to get you started off in the right direction:

  • Look for interesting light, don’t just wait for something to catch your eye by chance. Examine your surroundings thoroughly and seek out areas where the light is good enough to help add interest to an otherwise boring shot.
  • Even if a composition isn’t jumping out at you at first, start by taking some basic shots. As you focus on taking photos, you’ll notice your mind and creativity becoming more active by coming up with fresh ideas to try.
  • Shoot a lot of test shots and ask how you can make them better each time and try making the photo again until you’ve got it just right.
  • Go out by yourself and take your time. You’ll want to allow yourself plenty of time to experiment with ideas and discover different perspectives, lighting, etc…Go it alone, if possible, so you don’t feel pressured to rush.
  • Explore the scene. Shoot low, shoot high, shoot wide, shoot tight.

Remember, next time you find yourself struggling to get excited about photographing something, the key is to just start taking photos and experimenting. The more thought you put into, the more interested and involved you will find yourself. And even if you’re not in love with any of the photos you took, at the very least you got in a great practice session for next time.

YouTube video

[ via YouTube ]

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Tiffany Mueller

Tiffany Mueller

Tiffany Mueller is a photographer and content strategist based in Hawi, Hawaii. Her work has been shared by top publications like The New York Times, Adobe, and others.

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