Cheat Sheet: 11 Filter Types, What They Do And When To Use Each One

Jul 8, 2015

Udi Tirosh

Udi Tirosh is an entrepreneur, photography inventor, journalist, educator, and writer based in Israel. With over 25 years of experience in the photo-video industry, Udi has built and sold several photography-related brands. Udi has a double degree in mass media communications and computer science.

Cheat Sheet: 11 Filter Types, What They Do And When To Use Each One

Jul 8, 2015

Udi Tirosh

Udi Tirosh is an entrepreneur, photography inventor, journalist, educator, and writer based in Israel. With over 25 years of experience in the photo-video industry, Udi has built and sold several photography-related brands. Udi has a double degree in mass media communications and computer science.

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Filters are magic, and I am not talking about those buttons that punch on Instaram, I am talking real glass circles that you mount on top of a lens. The folks at zippi, came up with a fun cheat sheet that explains what each one does and when is the best time to use it. See the full stack after the jump.

As we noted some filters can be applied digitally, but some of the filters can only be applied at the time of the shoot. An ND filter for example will make sure that the sensor does not get flooded with light and a CPL filter filters out light that is polarized in a certain way, both can not be achieved digitally

Click here for the full version.

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[The Photography Filters Cheat Sheet [infographic] | zippi via lifehacker]

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Udi Tirosh

Udi Tirosh

Udi Tirosh is an entrepreneur, photography inventor, journalist, educator, and writer based in Israel. With over 25 years of experience in the photo-video industry, Udi has built and sold several photography-related brands. Udi has a double degree in mass media communications and computer science.

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7 responses to “Cheat Sheet: 11 Filter Types, What They Do And When To Use Each One”

  1.  Avatar
    Anonymous

    Badly outdated – only two of those filters are still rational on a digital system.

    1. David Maclagan Avatar
      David Maclagan

      The assorted colour filters being obsolete I can see, but you wouldn’t use UV, ND or polarising on digital?

    2. Theuns Verwoerd Avatar
      Theuns Verwoerd

      UV: already handled by the hot filter in camera. Whether a “protective” filter has any value is debatable.
      ND: simple ND is still valid.
      CPL: still valid.

      Notably, coloured filters and grad ND’s are no longer sensible.

      1. Renlish Avatar
        Renlish

        Grad, reverse and regular NDs are essential for all kinds of photography where there is a need for them; “need” is the caveat. That’s a look that you just cannot replicate in post – you can get a very close approximation but it’s not the same. I’m guessing those who say all these filters are redundant are happy with the “close enough is good enough” school of thought. (Not a bad thing, just not my thing.) The only ones in that list that are truly redundant are the coloured filters though they’re still fun to play with.

    3. David Maclagan Avatar
      David Maclagan

      You don’t think grad ND is sensible? You’d replace with multi exposure and post?

    4. Theuns Verwoerd Avatar
      Theuns Verwoerd

      Yes: grad ND’s suffer from boundary issues (interesting horisons are rarely flat). That one is a workflow issue, but multiple exposures allow less error-prone results and greater flexibility. (Plus it lets you get rid of silly things like light-painting in your frame by moving the ND during exposure.)

      Bear in mind that post is pretty much a given for anything beyond a throw-away shot these days.

  2. bw Avatar
    bw

    I think color filters can give you enhancement on bw photography. like if you want to expose the reds to the max it can filter blue and green so your picture wont get overexposed in the sky. gives you more dynamic in the end result.