A star is born: James Webb Telescope captures supernova remnant in unprecedented detail

Dec 11, 2023

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

A star is born: James Webb Telescope captures supernova remnant in unprecedented detail

Dec 11, 2023

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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Webb telescope Cas A

The James Webb Space Telescope has captured yet another stunning, detailed space image. This time, it offers a detailed view of the Cas A supernova remnant, a massive explosion that occurred about 340 years ago. This image reveals intricate features of the expanding shell of material slamming into the gas shed by the star before it exploded.

[Related reading: New James Webb Ring Nebula photo shows details and colors like never before]

The Cas A supernova remnant is located 11,000 light-years away in the constellation Cassiopeia. Webb observed it using its Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam). While it appears less colorful than the Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) image from April, it’s just as important. It reveals different details and provides astronomers with new information about the composition and structure of the Cas A supernova remnant.

Webb telescope Cas A
Cas A (NIRCam and MIRI Comparison); Credits: NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI, D. Milisavljevic (Purdue University), T. Temim (Princeton University), I. De Looze (University of Gent)

The most noticeable features in the image are the bright orange and light pink clumps that make up the inner shell. These clumps are composed of elements such as sulfur, oxygen, argon, and neon, ejected from the star itself. Embedded within this gas is a mixture of dust and molecules that will eventually form new stars and planetary systems.

One of the most intriguing features in the NIRCam image is the giant, striated blob nicknamed Baby Cas A. This is a light echo formed by light from the supernova’s explosion reaching and warming dust far away, causing it to glow as it cools. The intricacy of the dust pattern and Baby Cas A’s apparent proximity to Cas A are particularly fascinating to researchers.

Thanks to Webb’s unprecedented resolution, we can also see a few other smaller light echoes scattered throughout the image. These echoes provide valuable clues about the history of the explosion and its impact on the surrounding environment.

James Webb Cas A
Credits: NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI, D. Milisavljevic (Purdue University), T. Temim (Princeton University), I. De Looze (University of Gent)
Webb Cas A
“The image on the left shows a roughly circular cloud of gas and dust with a complex structure, with an inner shell of bright pink and orange filaments that look like tiny pieces of shattered glass. A zoom-in of this material appears in the box labelled 1. Around the exterior of the inner shell in the main image, there are wispy curtains of gas that look like campfire smoke. Box 2 is a zoom-in on these circles. Scattered outside the nebula in the main image are clumps of dust, coloured yellow in the image. Boxes 3 and 4 are zoomed-in areas of these clumps. Box 4 highlights a particularly large clump at the bottom right of the main image that is detailed and striated.” Credits: NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI, D. Milisavljevic (Purdue University), T. Temim (Princeton University), I. De Looze (University of Gent)

The new NIRCam and MIRI images provide astronomers with a comprehensive view of the Cas A supernova remnant. This data will be crucial for understanding the complex physical processes that occur during these events. It will also likely lead to new discoveries about the evolution of stars and the formation of new stars and planets.

[via ESA; lead image credits: ESA, expanded]

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Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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