Looking for a good place to shoot? Try these 9 photography location ideas

May 15, 2018

Chad Verzosa

Chad Verzosa is a freelance writer and photographer currently based in Florida. When not traveling, he likes to spend his time printing pictures in the darkroom.

Looking for a good place to shoot? Try these 9 photography location ideas

May 15, 2018

Chad Verzosa

Chad Verzosa is a freelance writer and photographer currently based in Florida. When not traveling, he likes to spend his time printing pictures in the darkroom.

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A lot of photographers are perpetually worried about location. It can be quite an issue, especially if you live in a place that isn’t necessarily photogenic. However, the photography duo Rachel and Daniel of Mango Street teach us in this video that you can create beautiful photographs just about anywhere.

YouTube video

Location may be important in photography. But as Rachel and Daniel show you, creativity plays a more significant role in creating quality work than just looking an area to shoot. By being inventive, you can easily produce Vogue-quality images even when you happen to be in such an ordinary environment. So what types of places are we discussing here precisely? Read the list below and you’ll realize you don’t have to go that far to find any of them.

  1. Through a cafe window
  2. Near a construction site
  3. Chain-link fence
  4. Hedges
  5. Underpass
  6. Indoor window light
  7. Stairs
  8. Tennis court
  9. Parking garage

The photographers of Mango Street make shooting at these locations simple, but there’s more to it than meets the eye. Quite frankly, there’s a great potential that most of the places Mango Street listed could turn out crappy. If you don’t know what you’re doing, there’s a good chance you’ll end up with crappy photos. The reason why they made these locations work is that they know how to find the right angles and good lighting. Most of all, they know how to make use of what’s around them (i.e., using barriers and fences to frame the model).

Although they didn’t say it in the video,  you should always think about your angles to exclude elements that may clutter your background. Just because they mentioned that you could shoot near a construction site doesn’t mean all you have to do is show up and take pictures there straight away. Survey your surroundings and always look for the best perspectives. Apart from that, you should consider how the light hits your subject as well. Remember that when it comes to photography, light trumps location.

With the right mindset (and skill set), you can pretty much turn any place into a great set for a photo shoot. If you have the imagination, you can surely make it work.

[9 Portrait Location Ideas in 90 Seconds | Mango Street]

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Chad Verzosa

Chad Verzosa

Chad Verzosa is a freelance writer and photographer currently based in Florida. When not traveling, he likes to spend his time printing pictures in the darkroom.

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