This 3D printed cage stops your microphone cable from falling out of the Rode Wireless GO II Transmitter

Nov 21, 2022

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

This 3D printed cage stops your microphone cable from falling out of the Rode Wireless GO II Transmitter

Nov 21, 2022

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Join the Discussion

Share on:

YouTube video

Now, I have to admit, this isn’t a problem I’ve faced myself, but it is a problem I’ve seen a few other people mention, both in person and on social media. The Rode Wireless GO II is pretty much the standard by which others are judged when it comes to tiny wireless microphones. That doesn’t necessarily mean they’re the best in every aspect, it just means they set the original standard because they’re the second generation of the first type.

One aspect where some users have issue is that the microphone cable occasionally pops out of the transmitter – or gets removed by talent and forgotten to be put back in again. As I mentioned, this isn’t a problem I’ve had but it’s one Caleb Pike’s had and he’s done something about it. He’s designed the Go-LOCK. It’s a 3D printable cage for the Wireless Go II transmitter that locks the mic in place and still gives you access to the belt clip.

It’s a very ingenious design that looks to perform its task very well. It comes in three parts. There’s the main cage, a removable thread that slides out and then a cap that screws on top and retains the microphone cable and locks the jack in place in its hole on the Wireless GO II transmitter. Caleb says that he’s tested it with the Rode SmartLav+ and the Rode Lavalier GO and it fits fine.

If you’ve got microphones with plugs that are a little too large for the screw cap, then you can always remove the threads and still use those while keeping the unit itself safe in the cage. This, obviously doesn’t solve the problem of the cable potentially pulling out of the socket, but it does keep your Wireless GO II protected against falls if it slips off the subject’s belt or whatever it’s clipped onto. Given that the thread and the cap are printed separate from the cage, though, there would be nothing to stop you just designing a new insert and cap for larger 3.5mm microphone plugs and swapping out as needed.

Caleb is selling ready-printed units on his website in a variety of colours for those who don’t already have a 3D printer, but he’s also made the files available to download completely free for those that do. You’re free to make as many as you like for your own use, but you’re not allowed to print and sell them. Caleb has even put together a video with a set of instructions on how to print it and put it together!

YouTube video

Even though this isn’t an issue I’ve had – yet! – I think I’ll have to print a couple of these out just to have them handy in the bag in case it starts to become a problem.

Filed Under:

Tagged With:

Find this interesting? Share it with your friends!

John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Join the Discussion

DIYP Comment Policy
Be nice, be on-topic, no personal information or flames.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

One response to “This 3D printed cage stops your microphone cable from falling out of the Rode Wireless GO II Transmitter”

  1. On the Other Hand Avatar
    On the Other Hand

    That is exactly why the Sennheiser XSW-D Lavalier set’s transmitter and the ME2-II microphone have threaded 3.5mm jacks/sockets.