NASA photos of Lake Mead’s extreme drought are a concerning illustration of climate change

Jul 25, 2022

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

NASA photos of Lake Mead’s extreme drought are a concerning illustration of climate change

Jul 25, 2022

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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While my brain has been boiling at 39 degrees for weeks now, I can’t keep my mind of the climate change that’s happening right before our eyes. NASA recently released satellite images that illustrate this change perfectly.

The photos show the “bathtub ring” around Lake Mead taken in 2000, 2021 and 2022. Over the course of just two decades, you can see the rich lake turning into dry crevasses, reducing the America’s largest water reservoir to only 27% of its capacity!

Managing editor of the Nasa Earth Observatory, Michael Carlowicz, called these images “a stark illustration of climate change and a long-term drought that may be the worst in the US west in 12 centuries.” Indeed, it’s incredible and very concerning that a lake of this size can be so significantly reduced in only 22 years. As The Guardian explains, Lake Mead is just one part of the Colorado River Basin, which is in danger of draught altogether. It “provides water to roughly 40 million people, 5m acres of agricultural land, and plants, fish, animals and birds that call the riparian ecosystems home,” this source notes. And according to Lower Colorado water supply report, this entire system is now at only 35% capacity, while over a third of the American west is now classified in extreme drought

I generally don’t complain about the weather, as it’s something I can’t control. But I think we can all agree that record-breaking heatwave isn’t something to easily disregard. You’d be surprised by how many people believe that climate change isn’t real and that it’s all just a big conspiracy. But then again, some people believe that the Earth is flat, so I guess nothing should surprise us anymore. And in case this scorching heat outside still doesn’t remind them that climate change is very real… well, maybe these photos will do the trick.

[via The Guardian]

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Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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4 responses to “NASA photos of Lake Mead’s extreme drought are a concerning illustration of climate change”

  1. jmaurophoto.com Avatar
    jmaurophoto.com

    It’s not so much the climate as it is the increasing demand for water in California. Let’s be honest here and not spread the global warming agenda.

  2. DIYP community member Avatar
    DIYP community member

    It is concerning and sad, the drought is real but it COULDN’T POSSIBLY be the booming population growth in the Southwest U.S. that relies on the Colorado River from the 2000 photo to the 2020 photo. California, Arizona, Nevada, Utah, Colorado, and New Mexico have all grown fast, and even Wyoming inched forward with new people over that course of time.

  3. DIYP community member Avatar
    DIYP community member

    2020 image taken in February, 2021 image taken in April, 2022 image taken in July…. Awkwaaaard!

  4. DIYP community member Avatar
    DIYP community member

    so why did the grand canyon dry up before the industrial revolution?