This living room shoot shows the importance of back light for making a scene real

Nov 16, 2016

Udi Tirosh

Udi Tirosh is an entrepreneur, photography inventor, journalist, educator, and writer based in Israel. With over 25 years of experience in the photo-video industry, Udi has built and sold several photography-related brands. Udi has a double degree in mass media communications and computer science.

This living room shoot shows the importance of back light for making a scene real

Nov 16, 2016

Udi Tirosh

Udi Tirosh is an entrepreneur, photography inventor, journalist, educator, and writer based in Israel. With over 25 years of experience in the photo-video industry, Udi has built and sold several photography-related brands. Udi has a double degree in mass media communications and computer science.

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I love a good living room studio. Not everyone can afford a full fledged studio and for many, the photography room living room is the only option. Probably not to the delight of the significant other.

Manny Ortiz (previously) shows a clever way to make the living room look bigger using a portable seamless black and a Light Blaster.

What grabbed my attention right away is how three dimensional the photos look, so I asked Manny about it. Manny tells that the secret is using backlight. There are three lights in each shot: A key which shines on Diana (a Flashpoint360 with a 47″ octa); A Light Blaster with a slide and a Flashpoint Zoom; and the key ingredient – a gridded and gelled strobe as back light.

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Manny told DIYP that:

In order to give the projection of the light blaster a more realistic effect, I used one of two options. To make the scene more interesting, I set a hair light with a gridded strobe. To make it look more real, I (roughly) matched the gel to the color of the projection. To make the photo more cinematic, I used a complementary color gel on the hair light. Either way it really helps selling the idea that she was really in that scene

You can see the full gear list and setup over Manny’s video:

YouTube video

Here are some photos from that shoot:

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Udi Tirosh

Udi Tirosh

Udi Tirosh is an entrepreneur, photography inventor, journalist, educator, and writer based in Israel. With over 25 years of experience in the photo-video industry, Udi has built and sold several photography-related brands. Udi has a double degree in mass media communications and computer science.

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6 responses to “This living room shoot shows the importance of back light for making a scene real”

  1. wikileak reader Avatar
    wikileak reader

    it is actually distracting since it is lighter than the light on her face. eyes travel to lightest point first.

  2. wikileak reader Avatar
    wikileak reader

    I do agree with the need for back lighting, when it is done correctly, this failed that test

  3. Troy Schulz Avatar
    Troy Schulz

    I disagree. The eye is normally attracted to the BRIGHTEST place first.

  4. Troy Schulz Avatar
    Troy Schulz

    I would argue that point would be either her face or the highlight on her hair. I think the hairlight is too intense.

  5. Gandalf Avatar
    Gandalf

    sorry but it looks in no way like it was shoot outdoors.
    it looks like a composit and that´s obvious.

    so if the backlight was to help the composition im sorry to say it did not help here.

    but yeah it´s obvious that a hairlight or backlight helps with making a subject pop.

  6. Richard Peke Avatar
    Richard Peke

    man this is too freaking awesome!! Love it…