How do you hold your camera? These are the best and the worst ways to do it

May 13, 2021

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

How do you hold your camera? These are the best and the worst ways to do it

May 13, 2021

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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When shooting in low light conditions at slower shutter speeds, it-s best to use a tripod. But more often than not, you’ll need to shoot handheld. In fact, some of us prefer it whenever it’s possible. There is no a single right way to hold your camera when handholding it. But there sure are some wrong ways that will end up with motion blur in your photos. You want to avoid those, and Chris Nichols of DPReview will share some useful tips and tricks for this. He’ll show you how to hold your camera properly and reduce camera shake when shooting handheld.

YouTube video

Chris uses a Canon EOS R5 at 70mm focal length. He shoots at 1/30s shutter speed and with image stabilization off, which makes it difficult to get sharp photos handheld. But you can still get fairly sharp and usable photos, and Chris shares some tips on how to do it.

In the video, Chris goes through several holding techniques and gives them pretty creative names: “Old man eyes,” “Mr./Mrs. Pinchypants,” “The operator,” “Where did I drop my SD card?!” and so on. He tests each of them by taking ten photos to see how many of those will be usable, and how many will turn out sharp.

In the photo above, my brother is something between “Mr./Mrs. Pinchypants” and “The operator,” and I’m “The Operator.” It’s one of the best positions to hold your camera when shooting handheld: keep your elbows tucked in, press the camera against your face with the gripping hand, and stabilize the lens underneath with your other hand. If you can, lean onto something as well for extra stabilization.

Camera holding poses are one of the first things I saw in more than one photography book. And when I bought my first DSLR, I embraced them kinda naturally. “The operator” is how I hold my camera if it isn’t on a tripod, and I do it in most shooting situations. How do you hold your camera?

[The Best & Worst Ways To Hold Your Camera via ISO 1200]

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Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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3 responses to “How do you hold your camera? These are the best and the worst ways to do it”

  1. Rui Bandeira Avatar
    Rui Bandeira

    I’m “The operator” :-)

  2. Smarten_Up Avatar
    Smarten_Up

    Personally, I will not use a camera that does not have an eyepiece, either optical or EVF. I can see the image better and “chimping” just leads to sloppy composition and sloppier sharpness.

    In all of these: no neck strap, no wrist strap? May not be sexy, but certainly more financially sound. First time your $3000 unit goes flying up, down, or sideways, you will wish you had that “security strap.”

    And depending on where you are shooting…prevents grab-and-go theft!