Here’s how you can edit Blackmagic RAW footage in Adobe Premiere Pro CC

Jul 5, 2019

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Here’s how you can edit Blackmagic RAW footage in Adobe Premiere Pro CC

Jul 5, 2019

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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When the news that Blackmagic were replacing CinemaDNG with their own Blackmagic RAW format, there was a mixed reaction. It’s Blackmagic’s own format, offering a lot of benefits over similar formats when it comes to speed, file size and efficiency. But it’s only officially supported by Blackmagic’s own DaVinci Resolve editing and grading software.

Fortunately, though, Blackmagic released the new format with an API that allows 3rd parties to integrate BRAW compatibility into their software. Adobe hasn’t picked up that gauntlet yet, but the developers at Autokroma have. Their BRAW Studio plugin allows you to use BRAW footage easily within Premiere Pro. In this video, Gerald Undone shows us how it works.

Although a large number of people seem to be ditching Premiere Pro and other editors in favour of DaVinci Resolve recently, Premiere Pro is still a hugely popular editing application. I bounce between Premiere and Resolve regularly myself when editing different projects. So while it’s a little disappointing that Adobe hasn’t released an update to provide native BRAW support yet, it’s fantastic that there is another way to use BRAW footage within Premiere Pro without having to transcode it in Resolve.

When I just need to edit something quickly, I usually do it in Premiere Pro, because for short projects, I can work in it far more quickly than I can in Resolve. BRAW Studio has worked extremely well for me, and the developer is regularly updating it to add features, improve stability and create a more overall seamless experience.

BRAW Studio is available to purchase for $29, and there is also a free trial available. There are two versions available. One for Premiere Pro and one for Adobe Media Encoder. Autokroma tells me that in the future, support will be coming for After Effects and possibly other applications, too.

Maybe Adobe will add native support at some point, but for now, BRAW Studio definitely does the job.

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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