Five ways to use Photoshop’s generative fill for real estate photography

Jun 12, 2023

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Five ways to use Photoshop’s generative fill for real estate photography

Jun 12, 2023

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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The Generative Fill feature in the newest beta of Adobe Photoshop CC has caused quite a stir. Some label it as the worst addition to Photoshop ever, while others see it as a valuable tool that can help photographers tweak things they couldn’t fix at the time of shooting. And while there are areas, such as photojournalism, where generative fill is going to be a big no-no, there are other areas where it can potentially be of use.

One such area is real estate photography, and one photographer who sees it as a valuable tool is Kevin Raposo. In this video, Kevin shows us five ways we can use generative fill with our real estate photography. He also includes a lot of caveats and disclaimers, so be sure to pay attention!

Using generative fill in real estate photography – if it’s a property for sale – is a contentious idea. It may not even be legal where you are. Some might see removing a cable or photo here and there as being quite minor, but it may still fall foul of misrepresentation laws in some places. So, be sure to look into this if you’re planning to use this on listings for property that’s actually for sale.

If you’re just documenting your own living space, or perhaps a particularly nice AirBNB you’ve stayed at and just want some cleaned up memories, then watch away. Kevin shows us five different tips to help us improve our images with generative fill, and the results are quite effective.

  • 2:07 – Removing small wires
  • 2:45 – Simulating a finished space
  • 3:24 – Complete renovations
  • 3:58 – Fill unfinished rooms
  • 4:35 – Remove garbage

Each of these has its place in a photographer’s workflow, and many of these are things a lot of photographers have done manually in the past. Things like removing wires, appliances or garbage from a property’s exterior can be a great way to clean up those holiday snaps visiting your aunt & uncle’s house on the other side of the world.

Simulating finished spaces, performing renovations or filling unfinished rooms are all great examples to show homeowners what a space can potentially look like. If they’re planning a renovation, building an extension, fitting a pool in the backyard, or just want to see what a space might look like decorated differently, this is an easy way to show them some options. After all, a lot of clients don’t know what they want until they see it.

How are you using Photoshop’s Generative Fill feature?

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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3 responses to “Five ways to use Photoshop’s generative fill for real estate photography”

  1. JR Dee Avatar
    JR Dee

    not interested….

  2. Lars Stokholm Avatar
    Lars Stokholm

    Reaching a limit: The 429 error

    If you exceed your per-hour or per-minute call limit, you will receive a ‘RATE_LIMIT_EXCEEDED’ 429 error message. You’ll then need to wait for one hour or one minute (depending on which rate limit you’ve hit) to resume making API calls to that endpoint.

    If you contact Bitly Support to help you with troubleshooting an API limit issue, please include:

    A description of how you are using the Bitly API.
    Which API endpoints you are using.
    An estimate of current request volumes for a 24-hour period.
    The email associated with your Bitly account.

  3. Arthur_P_Dent Avatar
    Arthur_P_Dent

    For photojournalism, it’s more like a huge “ah hell no.” I would also
    question going beyond removing power cords in real estate photos, unless
    the client is told in no uncertain terms that the image of the back
    yard pool is faked.