The candid honest moments of a commercial videographer captured 2 seconds at a time

Aug 24, 2016

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

The candid honest moments of a commercial videographer captured 2 seconds at a time

Aug 24, 2016

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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Whenever you work with an action camera, there’s a process. The general sequence of events goes something like this. You pick up your camera, power it up, point it towards yourself to see the lights flashing and start recording. You point it at what you want it to see and record away. Then when you’re done, you turn it back to you and turn it off.

Eventually, you notice an interesting phenomenon. The beginning and end of much of your footage will feature you. It only lasts a second or two, but it’s candid, honest footage. You’re not putting on a show for the camera, because you know you’re cutting it out in the edit. It’s something I’ve certainly noticed since finally picking up some action cameras a couple of months ago. Commercial videographer Tyce Hoskins turned his GoPro moments into this short film.

It’s an homage to the three years he has spent so far with his GoPro Hero3. In that time, it’s been to dozens of states over many miles, under water, and thousands of feet in the air.

Each moment is different, but each start and end to the story is the same. Me—clueless, tired, awkward, excited, caught in wanderlust, caught in love, caught in a moment. These moments don’t get shared. These moments don’t get famous. But these moments reflect who I am.

Tyce Hoskins

It’s interesting to watch. To see a person’s real mood and personality. What the camera captures when they know the footage is going to be cut out. When nobody’s going to ever see it but them. I might have to start paying more attention to those couple of seconds at each end of my own action camera footage.

What do you think? Let us know in the comments.

[Adweek via FStoppers]

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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One response to “The candid honest moments of a commercial videographer captured 2 seconds at a time”

  1. Kay O. Sweaver Avatar
    Kay O. Sweaver

    Reminds me of a video shoot I was directing where I would sneakily turn the camera on whenever the DP wasn’t looking and got all kinds of hilarious behind the scenes video including him committing the cardinal sin of cleaning the lens by breathing on it.