How to optimise your mirrorless camera tilt screen for waist level shooting with a piece of wood

Jan 1, 2022

Paul Richters

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How to optimise your mirrorless camera tilt screen for waist level shooting with a piece of wood

Jan 1, 2022

Paul Richters

We love it when our readers get in touch with us to share their stories. This article was contributed to DIYP by a member of our community. If you would like to contribute an article, please contact us here.

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If you just want to shoot from the waist then this is a tutorial for you.

The idea spans around taking a Canon EOS M200 (or a similar camera with a tilting screen) and adding a wedge-shaped piece of wood (40x55x800mm). Together they change this camera into a Hasselblad 907x lookalike. It’s something of a follow-up to my 2015 article on how to do this with a Canon Powershot N.

The making of the kite-shaped piece of wood is described in the schema below:

At my local woodshop. I ordered 4 wedge-shaped pieces of wood (40 x 55 x 800mm) (around €10,-).

Remove the excess wood to change the wedge shape into a kite shape. The two angles between the sides AB should be 90 °. Achieving this should be easy. Your local woodshop could do this as well. Also, saw a small part from a big wooden stir stick (28 x 40 x 4mm).

The images and photos below show the concept of the build:

Tips on building the wooden body part

The camera body on the inside isn’t completely rectangular. A small strip of wood has to be removed to let it fit under the pop-up flash.

To actually enjoy holding the new wooden body part of the camera you’ll have to round the edges. For this I used sandpaper.

You might want to stop the camera screw from coming loose from the ground plate. For this, I used a small piece of an old inner tube from a racing bicycle. These are thinner than inner tubes for a normal bicycle.

The use of the AE-Lock button is somewhat hindered by the wooden grip. Removing some wood the size of your thumb would remove this discomfort.

You can personalize it by painting it in your own favorite color.

The wooden stir stick (normally used to stir wall paint) I got for free at my local DIY store.

 

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17 responses to “How to optimise your mirrorless camera tilt screen for waist level shooting with a piece of wood”

  1. Greg Silver Avatar
    Greg Silver

    Is this for real? I didn’t know it was April 1st today.

  2. Jason Jackson Avatar
    Jason Jackson

    Did I read this right? “Together they change this camera into a Hasselblad 907x” This is completely pointless. Am I right? ?

    1. Henning Pedersen Avatar
      Henning Pedersen

      It said Hasselblad lookalike but still… Not very practical. Tiltable screen is supposed to be tiltable.

  3. Justin Case Avatar
    Justin Case

    Why didn’t I think of that.

  4. Karsten Bruun Qvist Avatar
    Karsten Bruun Qvist

    For a moment I thought I had taken a really long nap, and woken up on April first…

  5. spybloodjr Avatar
    spybloodjr

    D-I-why?!

    1. FrogLuvR Avatar
      FrogLuvR

      LOL … Good one :-)

  6. Ian Avatar
    Ian

    What does this do for you?

    1. Paul Richters Avatar
      Paul Richters

      Why did I find it necessary to optimize a good camera for waist-level photography?

      My answer is threefold: pleasure, ease of use and confinement.

      From the responses so far I think 9 out of 10 people don’t think this idea is for serious photography. Most people on the street feel the same way.
      Because people tend to ignore what they don’t understand, most people ignore me.
      It fits well with my shooting style. People stay relaxed.
      It makes it easier and more pleasurable for me to shoot street scenes.

      The responses shows that this is seen as a solution to a problem that does not exist.
      That may be true for those with small hands. My hands are a bit bigger.
      This part makes the camera body thicker.
      This makes the camera easier for to hold and to support.

      Creativity comes from limitation. Less is more.
      This attachment makes shooting at eye level difficult.
      By using this attachment I “limit” myself to wait level photography.

      For me it results in better pictures and more fun.
      I wish you a lot of pleasure with your personal way of photographing.

  7. Peter Young Avatar
    Peter Young

    Looks like my first question was removed! I’ll elaborate…… The tilt screen is variable so can be positioned at any angle and left at wherever you place it. With this DIY you successfully remove the advantage of having a tilt screen. So I ask again, why?

  8. Pulasthi Keragala Avatar
    Pulasthi Keragala

    Why is this an article

  9. Pulasthi Keragala Avatar
    Pulasthi Keragala

    Ma man desperate to get some clicks and get them sweet sweet ad views huh

  10. FairlyReasoner Avatar
    FairlyReasoner

    It’s a waist level finder for those times I want the lens pointed at the ground in front of my toes, yes?

  11. Madara Avatar
    Madara

    I just came for the comments.

  12. Dick Durham Avatar
    Dick Durham

    It’s a solution to a problem that doesn’t exist. Make it out of black plastic and photographers will pay a fortune to buy it.

  13. Martin Avatar
    Martin

    ????

  14. John Beatty Avatar
    John Beatty

    Sitting, eating popcorn, and reading the comments. Next.