The DroneDefender aims to neutralize drone threats and illegal activity

Oct 20, 2015

Liron Samuels

Liron Samuels is a wildlife and commercial photographer based in Israel. When he isn’t waking up at 4am to take photos of nature, he stays awake until 4am taking photos of the night skies or time lapses. You can see more of his work on his website or follow him on Facebook.

Oct 20, 2015

Liron Samuels

Liron Samuels is a wildlife and commercial photographer based in Israel. When he isn’t waking up at 4am to take photos of nature, he stays awake until 4am taking photos of the night skies or time lapses. You can see more of his work on his website or follow him on Facebook.

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Source: Battelle/YouTube
Source: Battelle/YouTube

Battelle recently announced the DroneDefender, an inexpensive, handheld, point-and-shoot system that will prevent the ever-growing number of drones out there from becoming security or safety threats.

Using radio control frequency disruption technology, the DroneDefender can disable a potentially dangerous or hostile drone from a distance of up to 400 meters by making it believe it is out of range. This will cause the drone to follow its built-in safety protocol (hover, return home, or slowly descend) and prevent detonation or other remote-controlled functions.

Said to be the “first portable, accurate, rapid-to-use counter-weapon to stop suspicious or hostile drones in flight, providing critical security protection at home and abroad”, the DroneDefender seems ideal in defending restricted airspace and sensitive facilities.

With no fear of collateral damage, it could also be extremely useful in protecting government buildings (*cough* the White House *cough*), embassies and schools.

The anti-drone system is lightweight (up to 10 lbs, depending on configuration), easy to use and can work for five hours straight. It also has a cold start time of less than 0.1 seconds, so law enforcement agencies will never find themselves waiting on the DroneDefender to start up.

Source: Battelle/YouTube
Source: Battelle/YouTube

The DroneDefender is planned to go on sale in 2016, but don’t count on buying one of these to take out your neighbors drone. Although the device can be used stateside due to the fact that it’s designed to neutralize the drone threat without damaging it, the DroneDefender operates on non-consumer frequencies that are controlled by the FCC, so its sale will be limited to government agencies.

Earlier this month Califronia Governor Jerry Brown vetoed a bill that would prohibit civilians from flying drones over prisons and jails. The reason for the bill was that drones are being used to drop contraband over prisons, but the governor rejected it stating that the bill would create a new crime, when the aforementioned actions are already illegal. The DroneDefender could somewhat solve the problem of these flying contraband smugglers.

This defense system seems promising, and I imagine it won’t be long before we see a similar system that does not require human intervention.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zX4XXLb_Vuw&feature=youtu.be

[Battelle via Digital Trends]

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Liron Samuels

Liron Samuels

Liron Samuels is a wildlife and commercial photographer based in Israel. When he isn’t waking up at 4am to take photos of nature, he stays awake until 4am taking photos of the night skies or time lapses. You can see more of his work on his website or follow him on Facebook.

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11 responses to “The DroneDefender aims to neutralize drone threats and illegal activity”

  1. Andrew Sharpe Avatar
    Andrew Sharpe

    And what will it do to planes that you aim it at? Small private planes might be reachable, and jammers are illegal for just this reason…

    1. Jason Wright Avatar
      Jason Wright

      Ever been in a plane that was radio controlled on 2.4Gh? I didn’t think so.
      It will do nothing to anything that isn’t being radio controlled by a specific frequency. Autonomous drones will fly right past and laugh as the idiots on the ground wave their magic toy-breaking stick at it.

      1. Andrew Sharpe Avatar
        Andrew Sharpe

        Of course the plane is not controlled at 2.4Ghz. However, there are reasons that activity on those frequencies on planes is disallowed, see http://www.tc.faa.gov/its/worldpac/techrpt/ar06-41.pdf , section 6.3.2 “The 2.4-GHz Band”. Therefore, sending that sort of jammer at those frequencies to a plane is probably not a good idea.

  2. Shachar Weis Avatar
    Shachar Weis

    It is illegal to interfere with ratio systems in the US. This generates enough RF to be super illegal to use anywhere outside a warzone.

  3. Thomas Reiner Avatar
    Thomas Reiner

    Do you think the police care? And if the they will put a exception for this…

  4. Axel Guldstrand Avatar
    Axel Guldstrand

    Emil Hjerdin

  5. Jason Wright Avatar
    Jason Wright

    This only jams radio control frequency. Anybody with actual harmful intent would simply use a non-standard control system and radio harden their drone. This is just a toy to break other peoples toys. I can’t imagine it would be legal and I doubt it would be safe (many drones don’t have a working fail-safe). At best it could be used to cause an otherwise harmless toy to drop on somebodies head. Nice.

    1. Rick Avatar
      Rick

      Their web page (http://www.battelle.org/our-work/national-security/tactical-systems/battelle-dronedefender) indicates it also disrupts GPS signals effectively eliminating GPS based route tracking. This would also disrupt the “return home” function potentially causing the drone to fly in errant directions or hover until it dropped.

  6. Harry Simon Avatar
    Harry Simon

    What’s wrong with a 12 gauge ?

  7. Jeremiah Johnson Avatar
    Jeremiah Johnson

    A high powered pellet gun works great on drones.