How I took this photo that gives you the key to the stars

Jul 26, 2017

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

How I took this photo that gives you the key to the stars

Jul 26, 2017

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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Do you have the key to the stars? Italian photographer Alberto Ghizzi Panizza asks this question in a marvelous photo he took one night in his home country. When I saw this photo, I couldn’t take my eyes off of it. It looks like a keyhole through which you can see a whole other world – the sky full of stars and the Milky Way. DIYP contacted Alberto, and he was kind enough to share the details of how he took the photo with us.

Alberto is a photographer born and raised in Italy. He is a member of Nikon Professional Services, and he teaches various photography workshops across the country. During Nikon School and Dream Photo Adventures workshop, he took this photo, which looks like a peek through a keyhole towards the sky.

He used Nikon D810 with a wide-angle Laowa 12mm f/2.8 lens. The camera was set to 25 sec exposure, ISO4000, and f/2.8. He also used a LED panel, to balance the light with the light painting technique.

As for the location, Alberto took the photo at Rocca Calascio, a mountaintop fortress in Italy. It was 3 am, high in the Apennines. To me, this photo reflects precisely the feeling you’d have at that time of the night, under a starry sky outside the city. So, apparently, this wonderful place is where the key to the stars is kept. And Alberto found the key to capturing the stars in the photo I can’t stop looking at.

If you’d like to see more of Alberto’s work, make sure to visit his website, and you can also find him on Facebook, Flickr, 500px and 1x.

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Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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3 responses to “How I took this photo that gives you the key to the stars”

  1. North Polar Avatar
    North Polar

    Neat :D

    Since I have no experience with light painting, I do have to ask. Why not just bring a flash with diffuser dome for light?

    1. CPBurrowsPhoto Avatar
      CPBurrowsPhoto

      You’d get areas poorly lit, others overexposed, making it appear very harsh. Light painting gives a much more even light, more like what you’d expect for omnidirectional light coming from stars. More dramatic lighting can take away from the real subject which is the sky.

      1. North Polar Avatar
        North Polar

        Oh okay :) Thanks for the info