Fuji’s new X-T2 has a 325 point Hybrid AF and shoots 4K video that looks like film

Jul 7, 2016

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Fuji’s new X-T2 has a 325 point Hybrid AF and shoots 4K video that looks like film

Jul 7, 2016

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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Fuji have now officially announced the Fujifilm X-T2, the successor to their premium X-T1, which finally brings 4K video to their camera lineup with record times of up to 30 minutes per clip.

Packing the 24.3MP X-Tranx III APS-C sized CMOS sensor also seen in the X-Pro2, the new camera also includes an upgraded hybrid AF system with 325 focus points, as well as an AF selection joystick on the back.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8SVs2tkAo88

It’s going to be a welcome update to Fuji video shooters who were feeling a little left behind by the lack of 4K in the other models, and if you want to save yourself a little time in post, you can shoot your footage using the built in film emulation presets which simulate some of Fuji’s classics.

4k-video-film-emulation

I think I’d still want to shoot flat or log wherever possible for most video projects, but the ability to throw on a Velvia or Acros look for a quick clip is definitely handy. I use a few film emulation presets with my Nikons for the same reason. As well as the film presets, F-Log is also available.

Fuji seem to have put quite some thought into video for this camera. They’ve also added a socket for an external microphone, and simultaneous HDMI output while filming capable of putting out a full 4:2:2 signal if you want to use an external recorder.

xt2-simultaneous-hdmi

The ISO range has had a little bump, extending the cap from 6400 to 12800, giving an extra stop’s assistance in lower light. Like its predecessor, the expanded range is ISO100-51200.

The tilting LCD screen has now been given a swing, so it’ll rotate out to the side, which can be useful when your camera’s sat in an awkward position you can’t get behind. I initially thought that be useful for focus pullers on video rigs, but it seems to swivel out to the wrong side for that. It could still be done, you’d just have to mount the follow focus unit on the other side of the camera.

One very welcome addition is dual UHS-II card slots, which is virtually mandatory now in most cameras above entry level. Pros who depend on these devices for a living are using dual slots more and more to be able to shoot backups as they go, and not have to worry about losing all their work in the rare event that a card dies.

dual_card_slots

Even if you don’t want to create backups while you shoot, dual card slots can be very useful for those who shoot stills and video with the same camera. You can have a smaller card in one slot for stills, and a larger card in the other to record footage, and I often work this way with my DSLRs when shooting video.

Like the X-T1, the max shooting speed is 8fps. Interestingly, they seem to have taken a leaf out of the Nikon D300 playbook, by boosting this cap once you add the grip. The grip bumps the continuous shooting speed up to 11fps.

xt2-11fps

The grip also allows 3 batteries to be used in total (1 in the body, 2 in the grip), and adds a headphone socket. I find that last bit interesting.

Obviously this is to try and convince video shooters to buy the grip if they want to be able to hear what their camera’s microphone is picking up while recording, but grips tend to be unwanted on most video rigs.

Most serious video shooters will likely be recording external sound anyway, and will only be using the internal audio for syncing purposes, but it still seems strange to limit this feature to the grip and not have a headphone socket built into the body itself.

But, that tiny little oddity is definitely outweighed by all the benefits the new camera seems to offer over the previous generation, and other current models.

pic_01

The Fuji X-T2 comes in two flavours, either body only for $1,599 or bundled with the Fuji 18-55mm f/2.8-4 lens for $1,899 and is expected to be available in September. Fuji are also releasing a new EF-XF500 flash unit, in September for $449.

What do you think? Is this the camera for you? Have you been chomping to replace your X-T1 or X-Pro? Do you think Fuji missed anything? Let us know in the comments.

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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2 responses to “Fuji’s new X-T2 has a 325 point Hybrid AF and shoots 4K video that looks like film”

  1. Tweakie Avatar
    Tweakie

    wait does the screen fold out to the right? why?

    1. pincherio Avatar
      pincherio

      So you can review it from above or below while in portrait orientation. That or they were too cheap to pay someone else for their patent