Five Audio Options for Your Home or Office Studio

Mar 19, 2015

Liron Samuels

Liron Samuels is a wildlife and commercial photographer based in Israel. When he isn’t waking up at 4am to take photos of nature, he stays awake until 4am taking photos of the night skies or time lapses. You can see more of his work on his website or follow him on Facebook.

Mar 19, 2015

Liron Samuels

Liron Samuels is a wildlife and commercial photographer based in Israel. When he isn’t waking up at 4am to take photos of nature, he stays awake until 4am taking photos of the night skies or time lapses. You can see more of his work on his website or follow him on Facebook.

Join the Discussion

Share on:

Photo: screen grab from YouTube video
Photo: screen grab from YouTube video

Being photographers we are accustomed to pay attention to composition, lighting, depth of field, colors, focal length and many other factors that comprise the final frame.

Photographers entering the world of video have the advantage of already mastering all these aspects, but one of the most important aspects in video gets ignored way too often – audio.

Audio recording is not something that automatically comes to mind for a stills photographer, in many cases leading to sloppy sound that ruins the video, but luckily Jay P. Morgan from The Slanted Lens is here to help.

Watch the video for five options for recording audio in your home studio. Jay explains the advantages, disadvantages and price of these solutions, ranging from free to $1,000.

YouTube video

The optionss discussed in the video are:

  1. Your camera’s internal mic
  2. Shotgun Mic on Camera (Rode Videomic Pro)
  3. External Recorder (Zoom H4N Handy Portable Digital Recorder)
  4. Lavalier Microphone (Sennheiser Lavalier Mic)
  5. Shotgun Boom Microphone (Sennheiser 416 Shotgun Mic)

Obviously anyone of the options will be better than your camera’s built-in mic, but Jay doesn’t only go into detail about why each method is better than the previous one, he also demonstrates it.

By the end of this video you will understand why the Zoom is better as a backup and why the Sennheiser 416 is the industry standard, even if you won’t be able to afford one.

While discussing the lavalier mic, Jay warns about forgetting to remove the mic when you go to the bathroom. True, that could be very embarrassing, but forgetting to take off your lav mic when you go to the bathroom AND confess to murder is even worse:

YouTube video

Filed Under:

Tagged With:

Find this interesting? Share it with your friends!

Liron Samuels

Liron Samuels

Liron Samuels is a wildlife and commercial photographer based in Israel. When he isn’t waking up at 4am to take photos of nature, he stays awake until 4am taking photos of the night skies or time lapses. You can see more of his work on his website or follow him on Facebook.

Join the Discussion

DIYP Comment Policy
Be nice, be on-topic, no personal information or flames.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

6 responses to “Five Audio Options for Your Home or Office Studio”

  1. Ignasi Jacob Avatar
    Ignasi Jacob

    Even videographers forget audio too many times…

  2. Renato Murakami Avatar
    Renato Murakami

    Great explainer!
    Problem with audio is that there simply isn’t one size fits all, or even one size isn’t great but might produce ok results.
    Well, arguably this is also true to video/image, but I guess audio is even more divisive.
    You can at least get some reasonable video from even a smartphone camera in an emergency, but audio… it’ll be one thing in studio, but then if you have multiple subjects it might be another, and if they are moving another. You might get good results from one type of mic in studio, and useless results outdoors.
    Then you have external recorder or not, sync considerations, levels to monitor. We often underestimate the complexities of it. And oh boy, how much easier it is to screw things up. :P

  3. Tuomas Avatar
    Tuomas

    Pretty cool! I did a very similar comparison of different microphones for recording acoustic guitar for video work. You can read it here: http://newcenturyguitar.com/microphone-for-guitar/ (there’s video there too!)

  4. udi tirosh Avatar
    udi tirosh

    That triangle gaff tape on the lav mic tip is golden! I gaffed mics on shirts before but the noise from the shirt brushing against the mic was always too much.

  5. JP Danko Avatar
    JP Danko

    Funny – I’ve gone through that exact progression step by step – I’m up to lav mikes and I just started thinking maybe a shotgun would be better. My biggest problem is noise in the audio – not sure if that is because I’m using a cheap mic or not recording it right or what – but i find it really hard to get clean audio.

  6. Apol Avatar
    Apol

    Another thing he should have mentioned is to make sure you monitor your audio with headphones. It’s always good to hear what your recording device hears.