Couple Has Wedding Video Stolen From Photographer’s Car

Jun 26, 2015

Allen Mowery

Allen Mowery is a Nationally-published Commercial & Editorial Photographer with over 20 years of experience. He has shot for major brands as well small clients. When not shooting client work or chasing overgrown wildlife from his yard, he loves to capture the stories of the people and culture around him.

Couple Has Wedding Video Stolen From Photographer’s Car

Jun 26, 2015

Allen Mowery

Allen Mowery is a Nationally-published Commercial & Editorial Photographer with over 20 years of experience. He has shot for major brands as well small clients. When not shooting client work or chasing overgrown wildlife from his yard, he loves to capture the stories of the people and culture around him.

Join the Discussion

Share on:

stolen-wedding-video
Whenever I’ve shot weddings, I’ve had nightmares about things going wrong, from malfunctioning equipment to missing important shots to losing the images I captured. However, for one couple and their wedding videographer, those nightmares became a reality.

Los Angeles couple Alejandra and Brian received a call from their videographer a day after their wedding stating that the memory cards containing the footage from their special day were stolen. According to KTLA5, the cards were with the photographer’s cameras and other gear inside his parked car when it was broken into sometime overnight.


Devastated by this unfortunate incident, the couple is offering a $500 “no questions asked” reward for the return of the memory cards. “I don’t care who you are. I don’t judge you. I just want the video,” Alejandra tearfully pleaded in front of a news camera during an interview.

While there may be a variety of reasons why the gear was left in a parked car overnight, this reminds us all of the importance of backing up our images and video as quickly as possible after a shoot. Weddings are once-in-a-lifetime events, which is why I stress so much when shooting them. If anything were to happen to those images it would be devastating, to the couple and myself.

A Few Tips

Backup immediately. When covering an event like a wedding, or any major shoot where necks are on the line, always backup your images in the field. There are many affordable image storage devices that give you portability while providing the security you need. For weddings, every camera card gets handed to my assistant who backs up the card on a portable device and gives the card back to me. If you are particularly ambitious, you can hack your own camera card backup system with endless storage, as seen here.

Keep copies in separate locations. For weddings, the original camera cards are never in the same bag or with the same person at the same time (with the exception of backing them up) as the copied files. If I have the option of traveling separately from my assistant, we each have copies of the images in separate vehicles.

And, if you are feeling VERY ambitious (and have more money than most people spent on a public university education), you can always follow a backup and storage workflow like Chase Jarvis uses.

At the end of the day…

…you want to do your best to protect those images. Not only are they important to your client, but their protection is vital to the integrity of your business.

[Camera with wedding video stolen from photographer’s car by KTLA5]

Filed Under:

Tagged With:

Find this interesting? Share it with your friends!

Allen Mowery

Allen Mowery

Allen Mowery is a Nationally-published Commercial & Editorial Photographer with over 20 years of experience. He has shot for major brands as well small clients. When not shooting client work or chasing overgrown wildlife from his yard, he loves to capture the stories of the people and culture around him.

Join the Discussion

DIYP Comment Policy
Be nice, be on-topic, no personal information or flames.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

7 responses to “Couple Has Wedding Video Stolen From Photographer’s Car”

  1. Jordan Stanhope Dean Avatar
    Jordan Stanhope Dean

    Surprise surprise, yet another case of negligence from the photographer/videographer not backing up, or at the very least removing the cards and taking them with them. They’re at blame.

  2. Fyrblade Avatar
    Fyrblade

    No excuse for this. In this world of paying thousands for photos and videos, for someone to not treat your once in a lifetime event with so little regard is ridiculous.

  3. Rick Avatar
    Rick

    F. Gump Photography
    Stupid is as stupid does.

  4. Jason Wright Avatar
    Jason Wright

    Why the heck would you leave them in the same camera bag in a car over night?!
    I’m not even a pro-photographer let alone a wedding photographer and I never let my camera bag out of my reach let alone sight and as for in a car overnight? I wouldn’t leave my lunch money in there let alone a single lens or camera.
    This is so careless I would almost suggest it was a way to get around screwing up the shoot yourself. “Hmm, this is a disaster, maybe if I pretend the stuff was stolen I will get away with it”.
    Not suggesting that’s what they did, but it would be going through my mind if I was the person who hired them.

    1. Ralph Hightower Avatar
      Ralph Hightower

      I agree. I’m an enthusiast photographer, not a pro. I have left camera gear in my car overnight, but that was only to get the gear and lenses acclimated to the winter temperature for nighttime photography. But I live in a rural area. But no, other than those few occasions, I don’t leave camera gear in my car. His insurance may cover the gear; but it won’t cover the memories.

  5. Imagineers Avatar
    Imagineers

    Everything was in one place? and in a car – overnight? No backup, no second set of cards stored elsewhere. Last wedding I shot I kept one set of cards in my pocket, a copy of everything on a laptop and separate hard disk and a 3rd set in the car between venues.
    My sympathies to the couple

  6. Michael Goolsby Avatar
    Michael Goolsby

    An unfortunate occurrence that would have, nonetheless, been completely avoided by more responsible behavior on the part of the photographer.