My Photography Workflow With Smugmug, WordPress & The Creative Cloud

 

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The first thing I want to say is that this blog has taken nearly a year to put together. Not through a lack of will power but mostly as I thought it fair to write a viewpoint after extensively using the set up giving me more time to fine tune the system.

This is long blog, I would suggest getting the coffee ready now before starting !! Also… I guess I should be upfront about my relationships with SmugMug & Adobe – I am part of the Community Pro team in the UK and have done a talk for SmugMug at the photography show and do use the affiliate program. However, I all genuineness, I do love the products that these companies provide and this blog is only about how I use them.

The workflow is built around 3 key elements , or 3 keyneeds. I want my images where I need them, looking good at all times and safe. The Creative Cloud (Photoshop & Lightroom), SmugMug & WordPress combination seems to this for me overall and most of the time. It is designed to be a multi-use Photography Workflow. While it is not the only way I work and it is not the most simple, it does work and is the safest workflow. Sometimes, just using Adobe Bridge & Photoshop then Dropbox or posting a DVD of images can work too! If your’e new to SmugMug – this is the place to get your questions sorted or put them at the bottom of this blog and I shall try to get to them as and when I see them, or any questions for that matter. We will also not go into how to edit photos or how to move or process images though LR or PS in great detail. Feel free to check out my retouching blogs for them

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Palette Puts Customizable Buttons, Sliders, and Knobs At Your Fingertips for Hands-On Editing

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Photo editing used to be a truly interactive, albeit laborious, experience in the days of the darkroom.  Now, most everything is done through mouse clicks, keystrokes, and digital tablets.

Palette aims to change that with their fully customizable modular array of buttons, sliders, and knobs.  This exciting new piece of hardware, which seamlessly integrates with Adobe software such as Photoshop and Lightroom, literally puts the editing controls into your hands and snaps together in whatever configuration best suits your workflow.

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How to Approach A Talent To Place a Lav Mic On Their Shirt Like A Pro

If you are shooting a video with someone who is not accustomed to getting videos that part where you attach a Lavalier mic to their clothes can be kinda awkward. If you are wiring up an actor, there is a good chance they did this before and they maybe even done this enough time to help you. But with documentaries or interviews it may be your talent’s first time where someone approaches them to run a cable through their shirt.

If you do it wrong (and there is definitely a wrong way of doing this) not only you look like a PITA you may also take from your talents confidence which you want to be high for the actual interview.

The Location Crew came up with a short 10 minutes tutorial that explains how to do this right. Interestingly enough, an important part of the process is not even related to connecting a microphone, it is connected to gaining your talent’s trust and breaking that personal barrier to make them feel comfy.

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90 minutes on 10 Tips For Optimizing Photos in Lightroom

Tim Grey took the time to provide 10 killer tips on enhancing your photos in Lightroom. Unsurprisingly, you can get a lot done to your photo in Lightroom and move from an OK photo (not that Tim’s photos are “OK”) to a much more refined photo.

Since 90 minutes are way too much time for just 10 tips, each tip is broken to mini-tips and those are broken again probably making “10 tips for optimizing photos in lightroom” a more suitable title.

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4 Questions Amateur Photographers Need to Stop Asking – And What They SHOULD Ask Instead

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“Love your photos! What kind of camera do you have?”

“… …”

Look, I get it. I’ve been there. Being an amateur photographer is tough for a lot of reasons, but a large one is having to humbly ask questions you desperately wish you didn’t have to say out loud. At some point in our lives, every professional has started out as an amateur. We’ve all been on the other side of the coin, secretly trying to make sense of all the photo technical jargon while still trying to appear like a coherent adult that deserves to own a camera.

Photographers are irritated by this question because when someone asks this, they are essentially reducing their entire profession to what they are currently holding in their hand. It happens a lot, and the insult is literally always on accident, but that doesn’t mean hearing it gets any easier. But while my blood boils every time I get asked this, I just have to tell myself to chill the eff out. It’s my fault for being annoyed, not yours. I know you don’t mean to be insulting; you just want to learn. You’re simply trying to figure out a little more about the process, and asking about the camera is your go-to step one. And that’s what everyone does! Hell I did the same thing as a newbie – upon observing the fact that my point-and-shoot just wasn’t achieving the same effect as a pro, the question out of my mouth to any photographer that would listen was, “What kind of camera do you have?” I was naive and stupid and I didn’t know any better.

But now I do know better. It’s not that it’s a stupid question, it’s just that it’s not the best question, and sometimes rewording things just a bit can get you a much more useful answer. It’s not that pros are mean or anything, they’re just human beings, and human beings respond differently to different questions. So in the spirit of helping new photographers get the information they’re actually after (while at the same time avoiding pissing off every established photographer they ever hope to learn from one day), lets lay down a few ground rules.

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When Common Sense Breaks Down: Why I Bought A Mirrorless Camera And Keep My DSLR (And Bunch Of Film Cameras As Well)

Benn Murhaaya - http://murhaaya.com

I read the article by Martin Gillman about moving back from mirrorless to DSLRs which was published on DIYP a while back and had to respond.

To get some background on me, I am amateur photographer, in the original meaning of the word (lover of) and also in the sense, that I don’t shoot paid gigs anymore. I used to work as a concert, event photographer, shooting around 20 gigs a week. For seven years, I’ve been a staff photographer at Prague based tattoo and body mod studio Hell.cz again shooting gigs and shows, at current time I am working with few pantomime theater groups besides doing my own stuff that ranges from building pinholes to shooting and developing 4×5 slide film with a view camera. (see murhaaya.com for yourself)

I mentioned the gigs to give you some idea, that I’ve sort of been around the block and I am not blabbing about something I don’t know anything about. My main workhorse now is still a Canon 5D Mark II with a four prime lenses ranging from 24/1.4 to 85/1.8. No zooms, that’s how I roll. You roll however you like.

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Some Hard Truth And Encouraging Words For The Beginner Photographers

A lot of time when you start at something you feel that you suck at it. And there is a good chance that you are right. We were all beginners at one point and we all made stupid and cliche photos. Here is an interesting view on what separates the artists who break through to create significant work and the ones who stay behind.

It is the ability to be persistent at your work and keep producing work until your skills match your taste (or your vision).

Actually, having a strong vision may be just the thing that drive you to be disappointed with your initial work.

If you have not made any 2015 resolutions yet, here is an idea, complete a project each week of 2015, the volume of work will help bridge the gap between your skills and your vision.