How X-Men: Days of Future Past Quicksilver’s incredible Slow-Mo Sequance Was Made

Have you seen X-Men: Days of Future Past yet? Even if you are not into science fiction that much, this is a wonderful movie to start with. It has a strong plot, good character building and (ok…) some mutants going back and forward in time…. (Ok, I’m a fanboy)

One of the most notable scenes in the movie has to do with a mutant called Quicksilver’s (Evan Peters). He is Marvel’s twin of DC Flash meaning he can move really, really fast. So fast actually, that it almost looks like bullet time…

In that specific scene Quicksilver has to get himself, Magneto, Wolverine and prof. Xavier out of a maximum security facility. Of course, this was the perfect chance to have some fun so Quicksilver knocks the hats off the security, makes them slap each other and tastes some of the food that is flying around. Wait a second.. Bullet Time? It may be quite interesting to see how they shot it.

Interestingly, it did not involve an array of cameras but a ton of CGI and a few huge fans instead.

[via wired]

Jellyfish Stinging In Microscopic Slo-Mo Shows They Don’t Rub Against You, They Use Syringes

jellyfish-venom

Have you been to the beach in the last few years? If so was the only thing you could think about was “Please don’t let that jellyfish touch me! Please don’t let that jellyfish touch me! Please don’t let that jellyfish touch me!”. And was that because of those slimy tentacles that smear venomous pain-inducing mucus on you?

I had those thoughts too. But it turns out that if you actually take a strong microscope coupled with a 2,200 fps Phantom Miro camera you see that it is not the slime that hurts you, it is millions of small syringes that extend from the jellyfish and inject venom into your skin.

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How The Launch of Apollo 11 Looks Slowed Down at 500 FPS

It’s been forty five years since Neil Armstrong and Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin became the first two men to walk on the moon. The more unbelievable fact for us, however, is that apparently had cameras that could run at five hundred frames per second back then, as well.

For thirty seconds, the launch of Apollo 11 was filmed by a camera on location at 500 FPS. The ending result was a stretched out to about eight minutes, and gave us one of our sharpest looks ever at the launch of a spacecraft. Obviously, the content shown is a breathtaking sight on its own, but I really found myself focusing on the aesthetics of the video itself after a few repeat views. How amazing is it that we’re able to see footage this sharp, fluid, and clear from 1969? Shot originally on 16MM film, the film was spotlessly converted to HD for us to be able to view online. Check it out for yourself, and stick around for the commentary by Spacecraft Films‘ Mark Gray. For a video that lasts just under ten minutes, what you learn for nearly its entire duration is half of the enjoyment.

Seriously though. With just how expensive film should have been at that point, NASA must actually have been receiving sufficient funding back then.

How Six Of The World’s Most Difficult Ballet Moves Were Captured In Slow Motion

When we came across this video, we were captivated. I’ve always been in awe of ballet dancers. They possess the most amazing hidden strength, machine-like precision, and grace beyond words.

What happens when you ask six incredibly talented ballet dancers to show you their hardest move and film it in slow motion? You gain an even greater appreciation for the skill they possess. This is exactly what Jason Aldag from the Washington Post’s PostTV did and the results are fascinating.

6-ballet-moves_1Aldag told me he wanted to show the Washington Post audience “something unexpected.” But, in doing so, he’s shown the world what these dancers can do. He even admitted that he “knew that ballet dancers were athletic but [he] was blown away by what the Washington Ballet crew showed [him] that day.”

Check out these amazing performers in the video after the jump

[Read more...]

Watching A Ball Hit Glass At 10,000,000 FPS Is Like Stopping Time

Over the years we featured quite a bit of slo-mo footage, but I think that this one breaks the record with an astounding 10 million (10,000,000) FPS movie of a small ball hitting glass.

The camera is so fast that it looks as if the ball is not even moving.

The movie was created with the HyperVision HPV-X Camera of Shimadzu. If you were wondering, the camera (including the power unit) weighs about 11.5 kilos and can only take 256 conservative photos @ a horrible resolution of 400×250 at that mode.

[via SPLOID]