Quick Tip: Use Pill Cases To Store 9V Batteries

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9 Volt batteries are good for a lot of things, but they are also somewhat dangerous as both terminals are on the same side and if they are not stored right can create a spark or heat up to the point where they could start a fire. Actually we share a tutorial on how to use a 9 volt battery to start a fire when shooting steel wool sparkles.

The folks at hdslrnow sent us this quick tip about using a pill case to store a 9V battery so the terminals are protected.

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Quick Tip: Learn How To Keep Your Cables From Breaking When Extending Them

You know it happens! Your cables are not long enough and you have to connect two of them together to complete those last few centimeters.

If you want to secure the cable you are probably making a small knot where the cables connect to keep the cable connected if someone tugs it. If done wrong, this knot is stressing the weakest part of the cable – the plastic and metal parts, and it can be the end of your cable (and your shoot). This tip shows you how to both secure the cable against accidental tugging and keep your cable intact for future use.

The secret make a simple knot under the connection and this knot does not involve the weak part of the cable.

Quick Tip: Using Menstrual Pads For Drying Lenses

drying-lenses

This is another one of those, I am not sure if this is an awesome idea or a what the heck is going on, but it seems valid so I am going to point a light at it, and see what you think.

Lebanese photographer Alexy Joffre Frangieh does extreme conditions timelapses and every once in a while he has to give his lenses a good dry-off. Instead of using silica gels (like the rest of us) he came up with an interesting spin-off. Alexy uses menstrual pads both as means of keeping his lenses dry in their cases and as a way of drying off wet or humid lenses.

While it makes sense somehow since those pads contain polyacrylate gel which absorbs liquids. But still….

Alexy uses those quite freely and you can check his site below to see how well they work for him. But still….

[Menstrual Pads For Drying Lenses | Alexy Joffre Frangieh]

Quick Tip (GoPro Beginners): How To Set Smooth Slow Motion Videos

If you’re not familiar with video editing and camera settings then shooting slow motion video with a GoPro can perhaps be a little frustrating.You may keep wondering why your new GoPro Hero4 slo-mo’ed footage is jittery and jerky. It may be because you need to sync the camera and editing settings. MicBergsma is here to help you out in this situation though: in his short GoPro Quick Tip he demonstrates the best way how to get the smoothest videos possible.

 Do you have any tips on shooting slowmo video? Feel free to let me know in the comments.

Quick Tip: Photographing a Reluctant Subject? Shoot From The Hip (Or From The Ear)

This has happened to me countless times and I wish I knew this tip back in the days when I was starting out. James Madelin (the ‘Orbis‘ guy) and Matt Granger (Get You Gear Out) just shared this incredibly simple, but useful tip on shooting shy people.

James’s tip shares a tip from his photojournalism days where he had to shoot people that didn’t really want to be photographed. His first tip is to shoot from the hip (which is kinda common knowledge), but it was his second tip that threw me off. Shooting people with the camera set against your ear while talking to them. They see the camera, they hear the clicks, they know they are being photographed, but somehow the fact that the glass is not standing between you and them makes them easier about the whole experience. The benefit of shooting from the ear over shooting from the heap is that you are shooting at eye-level and that you engage with your subject.

Now, of course, I would not recommend this for anything but photojournalism, as it may raise privacy issues, or start a small riot, but if you must get a frame for a paper, this could save your day.

[Photographing a reluctant subject | Matt Granger, James Madelin]

Quick Tip: How To Create Artistic Soft Photos With Any Camera

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Here is a fun creative trick for adding a ‘look’ to a photo. Photographer Simon Bolz shares a quick and dirty way to create a soft photo in camera by holding a small piece of glass or plastic in front of the lens while you shoot.

The trick is quite simple, hold a translucent object in front of the lens and move it around. As you move it you will get different softening patterns, depending on location and angle, you may also be able to catch some sun rays to either create a reflection or a light leak / burn / flare effect.

Head over to InMyBag for the full read.

P.S. If you don’t have any glass available, a nylon bag would do the trick.

Quick Tip: Secure Your Camera Zippers Without A Padlock

Have you ever walked in a crowded place and was worried that some stay hands may crawl into your bag? Or wanted to place your camera bag on the floor (or on the train or on the chair next to you in a restaurant), but was concerned that the zippers may become undone and the camera will “accidentally” fall through the bag into someone’s hands?

The obvious solution is to use a padlock (or a move my bag and I’ll scream!) kind of alarm. Sadly we don’t always have those handy. Out pals at Enlight Photo just shared this great security tip. While it will not protect you from someone actually taking your bag, it can definitely help reducing the amount of stray hands that crawl in. (they are using a Think Tank Photo bag, but any bag with zipper loops or pull ties will work) [Read more…]