Steve McCurry Recounts His Experience Photographing The 9/11 Tragedy

steve-mccurry-911

Photo by Steve McCurry

In a recent interview conducted by Sky Arte, iconic photojournalist, Steve McCurry, recounts his experience photographing the attack on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001. McCurry shared the interview online today, the 13th anniversary of the attacks.

The photographer was in New York City in an apartment within eyesight of the towers when the attacks happened, an experience which he delves into with a heavy heart during 30-minute video clip below. The documentary style interview also affords McCurry a chance to talk about his other works, including Afghan Girl, one of his most well known works. [Read more...]

Yale Organized 170,000 Depression Era Images And Organized Them Into An Awesome Interactive Photo Map

Migrant shed worker. Northeast Florida by Dorothea Lange Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Collection, [LC-DIG-fsa-8b29696]

Migrant shed worker. Northeast Florida by Dorothea Lange Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Collection, [LC-DIG-fsa-8b29696]

When a team of professors, employees, student’s and alumni of Yale University decided to tackle the massive collection of depression era photographs created as a special project by the The Farm Security Administration—Office of War Information (FSA-OWI) between the years of 1935-1946, they knew they were embarking on a massive undertaking. The collection, which have been meticulously curated and cared for by the Library of Congress and the FSA-OWI, contained a whopping 170,000 images, all of which would needed to be sorted and re-cataloged into Photogrammar, the new interactive map/website designed by Yale.

As a means of documenting the time during The United State’s Great Depression and to instill trust in the citizens of the governments new programs designed to provide aid and relief to the poorest 1/3 of American farmers, the FSA-OWI began working with photographers all over the country to grow a collection of images. The great Dorothea Lange, Walker Evans, and Arthur Rothstein were among some of the photographers involved with the project.  [Read more...]

Gawker Reporter Launches a Witch Hunt, Attacks a Photographer Allegedly Using Ferguson For Self-Promotion

Gawker-Logo-e1351599248616-1

Over the past month, the events taking place in Ferguson have become a significant catalyst for rising tensions between the public and the media. With the emotional responses that issues of racism trigger across the political spectrum coupled with the response to police brutality that we’re already so familiar with, there’s an unsettling amount of conflict for the journalists and photographers involved.

Just recently, that crossfire hit 30-year-old freelance photographer Leo York, who was present in Ferguson during the riots. An Al Jazeera writer posted an article discussing his contempt for the media’s reaction to the events, and mentioned how an unnamed reporter asked him if he could take a picture of him and Anderson Cooper. That same reporter also mentioned how he was there for the “networking opportunities”.

“One reporter who, last night, said he came to Ferguson as a ‘networking opportunity.’ He later asked me to take a picture of him with Anderson Cooper.”

- From Ryan Schuessler’s original article on Al Jazeera

After the post went viral, grabbing attention from multiple online blogs, Gawker reporter J.K. Trotter posted an article asking readers to find out who the people being referred to in the post were since the Al Jazeera writer, Ryan Schuessler, wouldn’t give out any names. Eventually, a few readers managed to deliver on the request, finding pictures of Leo York posing with Anderson Cooper on the former’s personal Twitter account.

[Read more...]

The Amusing/Horrifying Texts Between Photojournalists And Their Editors

A brand new Tumblr account has emerged in the last two weeks. Simply named “Photo Editor Texts” the Tumblr shares the amusing texts between photojournalists on assignment and their editors back in the office.

Ah, Tumblr, you a place of wonderment. Between the amazing photography related blogs (such as Zack Arias’ now retired 1,500 Q&A Tumblr) and amazing photo projects shared there, it’s a wonder I get much work done at all. But theres also a whole lot of ‘shipping of fictional characters and even more fan-love toward Supernatural and Dr Who, plenty of amusing cat gifs, and some genuinely hilarious people. Occasionally, you come across an amusing little project like this one. [Read more...]

Photographer Wally McNamee Talks About His Time With John F. Kennedy

A shot from the video of Wally McNamee's work.

“He would allow people to photograph his most unguarded moments with his family.”

Wally McNamee used to work for Newsweek, a job that took him everywhere from basketball courts to the White House itself. Many of the photos he’s taken over the course of his life have now become a part of history itself, and some of his most important work came from his time photographing John F. Kennedy.

[Read more...]

There Goes Your Workday: Toronto Star Photojournalists Show Us How They Get Their Shots

Screen Shot 2014-05-05 at 4.26.58 PM

Three nights ago, the Houston Rockets were taken out of the NBA Playoffs after Damian Lillard made a layup with 0.9 seconds left in the game. Before that 0.9 seconds, everyone was already sure that Houston was about to move on to the next game. A shot of Damian Lillard finishing that throw needs to be taken by a photographer that can keep up with the pace that game was going at. Photojournalism is a relentless job. Everything is unpredictable, and photographers have to be ready to capture that unpredictability.

The Toronto Star offers an archive of videos made by their very own photojournalists; in them they try teaching us exactly how they execute their work when they’re put in positions where they need to be quick on their feet.

[Read more...]

Documenting War: Matthew Brady on the American Battlefield

While the American Civil War was not the first armed conflict to be photographed, it was by far the most bloody and gruesome up to that point. Considered by many to be the father of photojournalism, Matthew Brady was a studio photographer in New York who began cashing in at the outbreak of the war by specifically marketing portraits to families whose sons were leaving with no guarantee of returning home.

"Havoc". Effect of a 32lb. shell from the 2nd. Mass. Heavy Artillery, Fredericksburg,Va.

“Havoc”. Effect of a 32lb. shell from the 2nd. Mass. Heavy Artillery, Fredericksburg,Va.

Eventually, Brady secured permission from President Lincoln himself to travel to the battlefields with the express purpose of documenting the conflict. Armed with a daguerreotype and portable darkroom, he set out to immortalize the realities of a war that not only shaped the course of American history but, de facto, the course of modern history. Brady’s exhibits and galleries, often filled with graphic images of rotting corpses on the battlefield, brought the realities of war to the home front for the mostly-untouched North. [Read more...]