How I Built A Huge Mega Giga-Panoramic Robot

giga-pano-v2-04

Today I want to share how I created a few huge, Gigapixel photos, using a DIYed panoramic head. Actually, it is not a panoramic head because it not only goes right and left, but also up and down.

I’ve been a big fan of panoramic photography and of landscape in general for a long time. But four years ago I was climbing a mountain and the view from the top simply took my breath away. I felt an urgent need to share the image with people don’t climb and therefore will never get access to such views.

Here is the thing though, standard photos do not have enough details. Our eyes have far more resolution that your standard digital camera, so a new project began: I wanted to build the best Gigapan Robot – an automated panoramic head for DSLR.

[editor's note: things get highly nerdy techy from this point on]

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Trippy Video Uses 6 GoPros To Create a ‘Little-Planet World

Ben Bloom and the team at Onion Creek Productions took the little planet panorama one step further and made a video that totally plays on the concept. In a video they did for Wild Child they mounted 6 GoPros on a device to create a continuous little planet video. We have shared small planet GoPro videos before, they were more of a proof-of-concept type of show. (I think they used the same mounting device)

This video incorporates the small planet perspective warp as a creative element which I find pretty interesting

Crazy Small-Planet Video composed with 6 GoPro Cameras

About two years ago the web was sweat with the latest panoramic trend – small planet panoramas (AKA spherical panorama). It was only a matter of time until someone got the clevers to elevate this into the next stage: Small Planet Time Lapse Video.

Photographer Jonas Ginter used a 3d printed a 3d device that allows him to capture photos from 6 different GoPros simultaneously and then combined the footage in post to create a movie of the same effect: [Read more...]

This 52,000MP Panorama Of Seattle Is An Artists Treasure Hunt

Gigapixel panoramas are getting more common now, yet, some have a bit of a twist on the usual amazing site-seeing extravaganza.

This 52,000MP Panorama Of Seattle Is An Artists Treasure Hunt

The team at Microsoft set out to show the stitching Kong-fu of Photosynth and created this ~20,000,000,000 pixel photo was made up from 2,368 individual photos taken with 600mm and 400mm canon lenses mounted on a Gigapan head.

In a similar way to the biggest where is waldo project we shared a while back, the team at Microsoft planted individual artists all throughout the image, making it a fun (yet challenging) find-the-artist-treasure-hunt. Unlike the where is waldo project, the artists were captured over the course of few weeks at six individual shootings. [Read more...]

The DIY Super-Robotic Panohead

panorama robotic headWhat’s better than Obama? An Obama Panorama, of course.

If you clicked the link above, you will find a 1,474 Megapixel image of president Obama inauguration. Yup you heard right. 1,474 MP.

This image was made possible with a cool robotic device called the GigaPan. The GigaPan is an automated robotic cradle that tilts and pans in small steps to complete huge panoramic views. It even has a little robotic arm to press the shutter release button for you. And now it is going DIY.

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DIY – The Panorama Head El Cheapo!

panoramic headHow to take good panoramas? Sounds simple, right? Take some shots with some overlapping landscape, go to your favorite stitching software, and stitch them up (I like panorama tools AKA PT, and autostich AKA autostich). Right? Not exactly…

If you’ve done a panorama or two, you must have noticed those annoying vertical stitching lines. Some are caused by wide angle distortion, some due to Polarizer filter that stayed on, and some are the “software’s fault”. Allot of those annoying stitching lines are caused due to something called parallax. In layman’s terms Parallax means that your camera’s focal plan does not “sit” (or as Neo would say – is “not in one”) with rotations axis of your camera. confused? Here is a great article to explain this. So if you want to get professional panoramas you need to do something about it; This something is called Using the Nodal Point (is it me, or does this term sounds a bit weird). Curious? here is how you find your Nodal Point. Of course DIYPhotography.net is not the first to find this Nodal thing. you can always get some cheap accessories for panorama at Manfrotto. Or you can try and build one yourself, just like Stefan Lindgren – DIY-er extraordiner. [Read more...]