Useful Tips For Shooting Time-Lapse At Night

Time-lapse photography can be used to stunning effect. The often-dreamy vistas passing by the camera allow the viewer an amazing insight to a location beyond what a still image may offer. I have spent more time than I care admit to watching videos on Vimeo and YouTube of amazing time-lapse productions of places far away that I may never visit myself.

While I admire these productions any chance I get, I have never taken the plunge into finding out how to create them for myself. Jay P Morgan from over at The Slanted Lens shares a guide and some tips on how to capture the images needed to create a stationary time-lapse at night.

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Essential Night Landscape Photography Tips from Chris Burkard

chris-burkard1Today’s post comes from extraordinary surf and landscape photographer Chris Burkard, who was recently featured by Smugmag’s short film, Arctic Swell. Chris has made it his life’s work to find wild, remote destinations and then capture the juxtaposition of humans in these environments. The world is an oftentimes harsh, humbling, and magical place, and Chris wants to photograph it all.

He shares his essential night landscape tips below. You can browse his portfolio and print store on his site.

It’s hard to beat the enchanting feeling of star gazing at a clear night sky. You soon become lost in its beauty like a giant kaleidoscope full of shooting stars, planets, and glow from the setting sun or nearby cities. I’ve traveled to countless countries over the past ten years and some of my fondest memories occur long after the sun has set. Whether it’s camping near my home in Big Sur or witnessing a rare northern lights show in the Arctic, I’ve had the privilege and challenge of documenting these night landscapes.

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A Picture of This Week’s Meteor Shower from Space Itself

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We’ve all got that picture that we can only shoot once in a lifetime. With the upcoming meteor shower this week, that shot might even come for one of us then. So when you’re a photographer working for NASA, it’s safe to say that you’re not just limited to one once-in-a-lifetime capture.

That’s the kind of shots that Ron Garan takes, while working as a photographer for NASA. Back in 2011, he had the opportunity to capture how the Perseid Meteor Shower looks from space, onboard the International Space Station itself; in celebration of the Perseid’s return, the picture was just recently posted on NASA’s website.

“Denizens of planet Earth typically watch meteor showers by looking up. But this remarkable view, captured on August 13, 2011 by astronaut Ron Garan, caught a Perseid meteor by looking down. From Garan’s perspective onboard the International Space Station orbiting at an altitude of about 380 kilometers, the Perseid meteors streak below, swept up dust left from comet Swift-Tuttle heated to incandescence. The glowing comet dust grains are traveling at about 60 kilometers per second through the denser atmosphere around 100 kilometers above Earth’s surface. In this case, the foreshortened meteor flash is right of frame center, below the curving limb of the Earth and a layer of greenish airglow, just below bright star Arcturus.”

- A description of the photo from NASA

By the way, this isn’t an event only exclusive to North Americans or Europeans. People from all over the world will be able to witness it this week. With the Supermoon coinciding this week, you should probably check out a few articles online on how best to view it from where you live. We might not all get a change to photograph these lights from space, but we can still shoot that lifetime-worthy picture. All it takes is inspiration and the will to act on it.

And money for gear. But mostly inspiration.

[NASA via PetaPixel]

This Timelapse Of Melbourne Will Have You Mesmerized By City Lights

Still a student of photography, Sam Woosley spent the first half of his year studying at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology in Melbourne, Australia. It was here where Woosley was afforded the opportunity to combine his background in film with the techniques and tools he was acquiring as a photography student. The result? An awesome timelapse that takes viewers on a tour of Melbourne and shows them the beauty of it’s city lights. Check it out:

Even as one of Woosley’s first attempts at timelapse (and the even more painstaking hyperlapse techniques) it looks like he pretty much nailed it with Hyperlapse Melbourne. The short film consists of just over 8,150 still images which make up all 88 of the timelapse clips the film consists of. It took him about 100 hours of work between setting up over 50 different shoots and post production for which he employed some of the usual timelapse editing suspects like Adobe Lightroom 5, Adobe After Effects CC, and Final Cut Pro X.

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How To Properly Shoot Landscape Night Photographs

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Shooting landscapes during the night can make for a stunning photo. Our eyes can see the night sky in great sensitivity – we can look at the stars and even see the Milky Way if the conditions are right. DSLR cameras, however, have even greater abilities than our eyes and can produce night photos with fantastic details of the night sky. These photos can be achieved by using the advantages of DSLR cameras like high ISO capabilities, fast aperture lenses and long exposures. But shooting night landscapes does not come without its challenges – noise and shallow depth of field (DOF) issues.

Shooting landscapes in during the day has an huge advantage when it comes to exposure settings. Low ISO means high quality, low noise and high dynamic range photos. Small aperture settings gain us large DOF, and the shutter can be set to almost any speed we want creating short or long exposures. When shooting at night, we have less control over the settings and some are almost pre-determined to allow enough light to reach the sensor. [Read more...]

A Reminder: Meteor Shower for North America Tonight Friday-Saturday

Photo courtesy of NASA

Photo courtesy of NASA

While we’re usually given a fairly early warning on when to expect an eclipse in the sky, or a meteor shower in the middle of the night, this is a pretty different situation. According to NASA, there’s a meteor shower headed our way late tonight – Friday- into Saturday Morning; the shower itself has never been visible to us before. It’s an entirely new swarm of meteors; remnants of a comet called the Camelopardalids.

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NASA’s Video Of The Lunar Eclipse Will Make Sure You Wont Miss The One In October

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Last night, a lunar eclipse came into fruition above us and the moon took the color of Mars. Living in Dallas, Texas, I was lucky enough to have a clear, cloudless sky so that I could see it for myself. All over North America, many others got to share the experience as well. #bloodmoon became a trending topic on both Instagram and Twitter, and people were genuinely excited to go outside and witness a wonder of the universe we live in.

But there were also many of you that didn’t get to see it. Maybe you had work, maybe you forgot, or maybe you just didn’t care. So here’s a video from NASA’s broadcast of the eclipse itself, from the Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles. Make sure you play it in full HD, and full screen; there’s good reasons why I didn’t embed you guys a weak 360p link here. [Read more...]

Photo Breakdown – Amazing Star Trails Night Exposure

Over the last few years I was obsessed with macro work. I decided to take a short break and experience/experiment with other forms of photography. I had a short (and enjoyable) period of underwater photography which ended abruptly when I introduced my beloved 60D unprotected to the ocean (not as enjoyable). After that unpleasant experience, I decided to stay away from large water habitats and expand my horizons by driving off to the desert and shooting the night skies (pun totally intended).

Photo Breakdown - Amazing Star Trails Night Exposure

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