A Picture of This Week’s Meteor Shower from Space Itself

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We’ve all got that picture that we can only shoot once in a lifetime. With the upcoming meteor shower this week, that shot might even come for one of us then. So when you’re a photographer working for NASA, it’s safe to say that you’re not just limited to one once-in-a-lifetime capture.

That’s the kind of shots that Ron Garan takes, while working as a photographer for NASA. Back in 2011, he had the opportunity to capture how the Perseid Meteor Shower looks from space, onboard the International Space Station itself; in celebration of the Perseid’s return, the picture was just recently posted on NASA’s website.

“Denizens of planet Earth typically watch meteor showers by looking up. But this remarkable view, captured on August 13, 2011 by astronaut Ron Garan, caught a Perseid meteor by looking down. From Garan’s perspective onboard the International Space Station orbiting at an altitude of about 380 kilometers, the Perseid meteors streak below, swept up dust left from comet Swift-Tuttle heated to incandescence. The glowing comet dust grains are traveling at about 60 kilometers per second through the denser atmosphere around 100 kilometers above Earth’s surface. In this case, the foreshortened meteor flash is right of frame center, below the curving limb of the Earth and a layer of greenish airglow, just below bright star Arcturus.”

- A description of the photo from NASA

By the way, this isn’t an event only exclusive to North Americans or Europeans. People from all over the world will be able to witness it this week. With the Supermoon coinciding this week, you should probably check out a few articles online on how best to view it from where you live. We might not all get a change to photograph these lights from space, but we can still shoot that lifetime-worthy picture. All it takes is inspiration and the will to act on it.

And money for gear. But mostly inspiration.

[NASA via PetaPixel]

A Beautiful 4 Years Timelapse Showing A Star Exploding 20,000 Years Ago

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While this star exploded about 20,000 years ago (and captured on film starting  12 years ago), NASA has just released a mesmerizing time lapse showing its explosion and death and trippy music.

The star called was captured by the Hubble space telescope “erupting” about 10 years ago, emitting a flash-bulb like burst of light, illuminating the interstellar dust.

Just to get a sense of scale, the image is 13.6 light-years wide, this is not even at the scale of our solar system which is roughly 8 light-hours wide. [Read more...]

NASA Releases Massive 3.2-Gigabyte Mosaic of Earth, Made Entirely from Selfies

Photo courtesy of NASA

Photo courtesy of NASA

Last month on the 22nd – NASA marked Earth Day by asking readers around the world to submit a selfie, answering where exactly they were at that moment. While reading that out loud can slightly come off as an Illuminati theorist’s heart attack, the aeronautics administration had completely different plans. Today, they released what they accomplished with that request: a gigantic 3.2-gigabyte mosaic of the earth, composed of the pictures that everyone sent.

[Read more...]

A Reminder: Meteor Shower for North America Tonight Friday-Saturday

Photo courtesy of NASA

Photo courtesy of NASA

While we’re usually given a fairly early warning on when to expect an eclipse in the sky, or a meteor shower in the middle of the night, this is a pretty different situation. According to NASA, there’s a meteor shower headed our way late tonight – Friday- into Saturday Morning; the shower itself has never been visible to us before. It’s an entirely new swarm of meteors; remnants of a comet called the Camelopardalids.

[Read more...]

Hackers Recover NASA’s Lost Lunar Photos. Look Better Than The Originals

Back in 1966, the US was on a hunt for landing on the moon. As part of NASA’s location scouting for a landing site, they sent five Lunar Orbiters satellites to photograph the moon. After sending those photos to earth, the Orbiters were crushed into the moon, clearing oath for Apollo, with the original film lost forever, and only a poorly rendered images remaining back here on earth.

Earthrise over the Moon as seen by Lunar Orbiter 1 on August 24, 1966

Earthrise over the Moon as seen by Lunar Orbiter 1 on August 24, 1966

The Lunar Orbiter Image Recovery Project (LOIRP), is a team of self-appointed hackers whose mission is to regenerate those photographs. Wired‘s  Doug Bierend wonderful shared their story with the world. [Read more...]

NASA’s Video Of The Lunar Eclipse Will Make Sure You Wont Miss The One In October

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Last night, a lunar eclipse came into fruition above us and the moon took the color of Mars. Living in Dallas, Texas, I was lucky enough to have a clear, cloudless sky so that I could see it for myself. All over North America, many others got to share the experience as well. #bloodmoon became a trending topic on both Instagram and Twitter, and people were genuinely excited to go outside and witness a wonder of the universe we live in.

But there were also many of you that didn’t get to see it. Maybe you had work, maybe you forgot, or maybe you just didn’t care. So here’s a video from NASA’s broadcast of the eclipse itself, from the Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles. Make sure you play it in full HD, and full screen; there’s good reasons why I didn’t embed you guys a weak 360p link here. [Read more...]

The Hassy Used On Moon Landing Was Just Sold For $758,489

If you ever wondered how much some of your used gear can be sold for, looking at this auction may be a good buzz (though totally relevant). The Hasselblad 500 that was used to shoot the landing on the moon was recently auctioned for about 3/4 of million dollars. $758,489 to be exact.

The Hassy Used On Moon Landing Was Just Sold For $758,489

Galerie Westlicht which held the auction, described the gear as “part of the equipment carried by the 1971 Apollo 15 mission, the fourth manned mission to land on the moon”.

Bidding started at about $100,000 and the lucky new owner of the camera is now Japanese businessman Terukazu Fujisawa, founder of Japanese retail chain Yodobashi Camera. [Read more...]