How Richard Prince Sells Other People’s Instagram Photos for $100,000

Money

If you were to take a screen shot of someone’s Instagram account and try selling it, two things would happen. The first is that you’d be told you’re violating the copyright of the photographer whose photo you’re selling, and secondly you’d be laughed at. Extensively.

It turns out, though, that if you’re famous enough you can take such a screen shot and not only bypass copyright but also make a fortune doing so.

The secret: slap some text on it.

Richard Prince has been using this method and some of his “artwork” is said to have been sold for $100,000.

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Japan Tightens Lenient Laws after Radioactive Drone Lands on Prime Minister’s Roof

Tokyo

Less than a month after a camera-equipped drone carrying trace amounts of radioactive substances was discovered on the roof of the Japanese prime minister’s office, legislators are starting to crack down on radio-controlled aerial devices.

Drones have been banned in all 81 of Tokyo’s public parks and gardens, and additional legislation is in the works and will ban using them above “important facilities” such as government buildings, embassies, the Imperial Palace and the Supreme Court.

Now that drones have made headlines in the country and attracted the attention of lawmakers, it is expected that even more laws will be implemented ahead of the G7 Summit in 2016 and the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.

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Atlanta Police Department Sanctioned for Obstructing Filming and Photographing Police Conduct

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Felicia Anderson took the City of Atlanta to court for violating her constitutional rights when she was arrested in 2009 while photographing police activity, and besides damages, a consent order was agreed upon.

As the city and its police department failed to comply with the court’s order, federal judge Steve C. Jones found the two in contempt of court. Additionally, he imposed sanctions should they continue to fail to comply with the 2012 decision.

Among the requirements are that all APD officers undergo in-person training on the matter and make it a firing offense to interfere with a citizen’s right to record police.

The City of Atlanta will be fined $20,000 per day, should it fail to implement the previous and current court order within the given timeframe.

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Facebook Representative Claims They Own Your Photos

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If you use Facebook, you’re not going to be happy reading this post. If you also upload your work to the social media, you’re REALLY not going to like this.

Corey Ann Balazowich of Photo Stealers reports that the worrying message that goes round every once in a while claiming that Facebook’s new Terms of Use strip photographers of any rights regarding uploaded content might not be a hoax after all.

An email she recently received from a Facebook representative states that the company owns any and all content once it is uploaded to their website, and that basically anybody can use it as they wish. They may even take credit for your copyrighted photos.

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Authorities Halt the Ban on Commercial Portraits Following a Photographer’s Lawsuit

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Back in February we reported that Josephine Havlak, a commercial photographer from St. Louis, sued the village of Twin Oaks over its decision to ban commercial photography in the local park.

Following her lawsuit, the village’s board of trustees has decided to refrain from enforcing the ban for at least 45 days, while the village negotiates with Havlak’s attorney.

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Spying Photographer Beats Privacy Claims Thanks to a 113-Year-Old Law

Building

Many of you may remember Arne Svenson, the New York artist who photographed his neighbors in their homes using a telephoto lens and used them in an exhibition.

Svenson began the project after watching Alfred Hitchcocks’ “Rear Window” and being advised by a lawyer that the presumption of privacy is minimal in such a jam-packed city.

The “Neighbors” exhibition was obviously very controversial and led to some of the subjects suing Svenson, though the NY Country Supreme Court dismissed the case in 2013.

A Manhattan appeals court agreed with the previous court ruling, citing the photographer was in the clear due to a law from 1902, and urged legislators to consider a reform to the privacy laws.

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Colorado Introduces “Right to Record” Bill Punishing Police Officers Interfering With Photographers

Colorado Police

In a pleasantly surprising yet most welcome turn of events legislators have proposed a bill that will protect photographers’ rights and increase police oversight, rather than limit them suggested by several recent bills.

Unlike the bill proposed in the nearby state of Texas, banning photography within 25 feet of police, Colorado’s bill seeks to punish officers who interfere with lawful recordings of police activity by imposing significant penalties on violators.

The bill, titled “Concerning Prohibiting A Peace Officer From Interfering With A Person Lawfully Recording A Peace Officer-Involved Incident”, is just one of the steps being considered in order to increase police oversight in Colorado and hopefully it will lead to similar legislation in other states.

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Indiana Amends Law Allowing Photographers to Refuse Same-Sex Clients After Being Blasted By the White House

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The state of Indiana recently approved a law allowing businesses to decline same-sex clients. Bill supporters promoted it stating that “Christian bakers, florists and photographers should not be punished for refusing to participate in a homosexual marriage!”.

Prior to signing the amendment Indiana governor Mike Pence continued to protect the law claiming it is identical to the 1993 federal religious freedom law.

White House press secretary Josh Earnest said Pence and other state officials are in “damage control mode”, and debunked the governor’s lies about the similarity between the two laws.

The following day an amendment was approved by Indiana’s House, Senate and governor, though not without resistance.

While this law did not refer solely to photographers, the only court case of a business being sued due to a state-level religious freedom act was against a photographer.

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Arkansas Governor Vetoes Bill Threatening to Criminalize Photographers Worldwide

 

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We recently reported Senate Bill 79 which intended to protect people from unauthorized commercial use without the person’s written consent, but in reality threatened to end street photography and criminalize photographers worldwide.

The huge outcry regarding the proposed law worked and Arkansas Governor Asa Hutchinson has just announced that he had vetoed the bill.

Bill supporters may attempt to override the veto, but the National Press Photographers Association states this is a clear win for photographers’ rights.

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