Japan Tightens Lenient Laws after Radioactive Drone Lands on Prime Minister’s Roof

Tokyo

Less than a month after a camera-equipped drone carrying trace amounts of radioactive substances was discovered on the roof of the Japanese prime minister’s office, legislators are starting to crack down on radio-controlled aerial devices.

Drones have been banned in all 81 of Tokyo’s public parks and gardens, and additional legislation is in the works and will ban using them above “important facilities” such as government buildings, embassies, the Imperial Palace and the Supreme Court.

Now that drones have made headlines in the country and attracted the attention of lawmakers, it is expected that even more laws will be implemented ahead of the G7 Summit in 2016 and the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.

[Read more…]

Japan Has Spoken: Canon Dominates, Sony Dethrones Olympus And Nikon Stutter

8664804967_74867561f5_h

Market research and analysis firm BCN announced the annual BCN Awards 2015.

Winners are determined based on sales volume, calculated from data gathered from thousands of sellers throughout Japan.

Canon seems to be doing better than ever, while Nikon is just barely holding its ground.

Sony gets its first taste of victory (and a painful failure) and SanDisk maintains its top spot.

A bit of digging reveals why names like Think Tank, Lowepro and Manfrotto won’t make the list.

[Read more…]

Kyoto Moves To Make Upskirting a Painful Offence

4602219260_1aeb6ebe9d_b

Earlier today, The Japan Times released that officials in Kyoto, Japan, had revised ordinance in order to crack down on the practice of upskirt photography (making unauthorized photographs under a woman’s skirt). The highly popular tourist destination in Japan is flooded with tourists every spring, mostly high school students, and “upskirting” had reached disturbing levels, with even “a whole subgenre of magazines” existing for individuals to sell their images.

This perverted practice has always been outlawed in Japan, but only in public places such as shopping centers, railway stations, and public transport. Individuals taking these photographs had found a loophole which made them untouchable by police by taking their photos in places not covered under the definition of a “public place.” The change in ordinance has seen the expansion of the “scope of protection” to include places such as schools, workplaces and hospitals, and has increased penalties for the use of hidden cameras in areas such as hot spring baths, changing rooms and public restrooms. Penalties can now be as high as ¥1 million (about $9815) or a year in jail. [Read more…]