This Extensive Tutorial Will Show You Everything You Need To Know About High Speed Photography

Maurice Ribble, the maker behind CameraAxe,  probably one of the higher authorities on high speed photography today just released one of the most extensive lectures on high speed photography that I have seen to date.

It is not a fancy video like we are used to, but rather a slide based lecture, but nevertheless the information there is priceless.

It goes from the very most trivial question of “what is high speed photography” to some basic concepts like why you want to use a strobe to freeze the action using a strobe and not a high shutter speed. Maurice is then doing a few extensive how-to tutorials on drops and balloons and ending with some fancy setups using uber powerful (and slightly dangerous) air gap strobes. [Read more...]

Invisible Waves: NPR Science Video Shows Exactly What Sound Looks Like

Screen Shot from Video.

Back in the mid-1800s, August Toepler gave us a way to be able to look at sound. Not synthetically visualize it- but actually be able to look at it. His invention was called Schilieron Flow Visualization; by implementing the complex technique into your camerawork, you’ll actually be able to see waves. Whether it’s the waves made from the snap of your fingers, or the waves from the hiss of an opened Pepsi bottle- you can see the noise they make. And NPR released a video that shows you how its done.

[Read more...]

Beautiful High Speed Photographs of Ink and Water

Italian graphic designer and photographer Alberto Seveso was fascinated by the art on album covers of heavy metal albums and skateboard plates. and decided to create similar art by pouring ink into water.

alberto-seveso-37

By using specific ink consistency and a dedicated pouring process Alberto creates these images. While often the end result is careful planned, a lot of the process was discovered by a chain of creative mistakes. It is pretty cool to see how Alberto celebrates those mistakes.

[Read more...]

Watching A Ball Hit Glass At 10,000,000 FPS Is Like Stopping Time

Over the years we featured quite a bit of slo-mo footage, but I think that this one breaks the record with an astounding 10 million (10,000,000) FPS movie of a small ball hitting glass.

The camera is so fast that it looks as if the ball is not even moving.

The movie was created with the HyperVision HPV-X Camera of Shimadzu. If you were wondering, the camera (including the power unit) weighs about 11.5 kilos and can only take 256 conservative photos @ a horrible resolution of 400×250 at that mode.

[via SPLOID]

Google Dabs In High Speed Photography

google high speedYou can trust Google to do things BIG. Google was set to show the rendering speed of the Google browser – Chrome.

To show how fast the Chrome browser actually is they compared it with several high speed plays. That is to say, they burned, crushed and splashed all over the place like little kids and shot it in slo-mo HD. How slow mo? 2700 frames per seconds.

(If you are reading this via RSS, and don’t see the video, click through. If you do see the video, you may want to verify that your speakers are not set to high).

To show how fast the browser actually is they compared it with several high speed plays. That is to say, they burned, crushed and splashed all over the place like little kids and shot it in slo-mo HD. How slow mo? 2700 frames per seconds slow mo. They did it using a Phantom v640 cam, which can actually go up to 8K images per seconds if you are willing to throw HD away.

[Read more...]

Strawberry Splash – Thoughts About High Speed Photography

Strawberry Milk Splash in a spoon (blue background) (by david.kittos)Gotta love strawberries. And gotta love strawberries in cream even more.

Maybe this is why my taste buds had me coming to this picture again and again.

Then again, it might be the technical details of the shot that drew my attention. Getting a nice splash is hard enough but getting strawberry on spoon splash is nearly impossible. Read on for some musings, thoughts and tips.

[Read more...]

Holding a Nuclear Reactor – A Balloon Shot Anatomy

Holding a Nuclear Reactor - A Balloon Shot Anatomy One of the things I like best is High Speed Photography, it is an art that combines a hard technical challenge, along with an opportunity to have an artistic say. We’ve featured a few DIY articles about DIYing it, but nothing beats dedicated controllers.

This is why I was really happy to play a bit with the Universal Photo Timer – a heaven for High Speed Photographers. I’ll write a review about it soon. (I know – the name says timer, but it is actually way more then just a timer) Till then, I’d like to share a High Speed shot I did, and with it the process of polishing a picture (or some aspects of it) till it is good. I will also discuss about what’s missing from the final image.
[Read more...]

Shooting Balloons – DIYing High Speed Photography

shooting_balloons.jpgIt looks like this weekend is going to be weekend at the movies for all photography lovers. So sit back, and enjoy. Now, the trick is get up once the show is over and try some of the things yourself.

After two brilliant videos from Jim Talkington dealing with studio lighting on a budget, comes something completely different.

Photographer and DIYer Guy Montag came up with a nice and easy I-have-no-idea-about-electronics way to make high speed photography shots.

More chat and the video tutorial after the jump.

[Read more...]

Great High Speed Photography Trigger by Tom Barnett

flash triggerTom Barnett (pxlsnfr) has come up with some great High Speed Photography shots.

Tom uses very basic circuitry to trigger the flash on “hearing noise” and a bit more complex (though still pretty simple) circuit to avoid repeating flash triggering.

In fact the basic circuitry is just one SCR with plus and minus going to the flash and minus and gate going to an amplified mic. See pictures below.

From the number of crushed bulbs on Tom’s photostream, I’d recommend his services to any person that wants to be environment friendly and move to Energy-saving compact fluorescents (CFs).

What I like about Tom’s High Speed Photography, is that Tom controls this technique flawlessly, and can use it to photograph images with a great amount of creativity.

pxlsnfr flash trigger

[Read more...]